Chapter 5. Form and Identity in Northern Irish Poetry

  1. Nigel Alderman Assistant Professor2 and
  2. C. D. Blanton Assistant Professor3
  1. John P. Waters Clinical Assistant Professor

Published Online: 23 APR 2009

DOI: 10.1002/9781444310306.ch5

A Concise Companion to Postwar British and Irish Poetry

A Concise Companion to Postwar British and Irish Poetry

How to Cite

Waters, J. P. (2009) Form and Identity in Northern Irish Poetry, in A Concise Companion to Postwar British and Irish Poetry (eds N. Alderman and C. D. Blanton), Wiley-Blackwell, Oxford, UK. doi: 10.1002/9781444310306.ch5

Editor Information

  1. 2

    Mount Holyoke College, USA

  2. 3

    University of California, Berkeley, USA

Author Information

  1. New York University, USA

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 23 APR 2009
  2. Published Print: 10 APR 2009

ISBN Information

Print ISBN: 9781405129244

Online ISBN: 9781444310306

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Keywords:

  • Northern Irish poetry denominates a subset of an ethnicity - No glass of ours was ever raised / to toast The Queen;
  • “Northern Renaissance” of Irish poetry identifies the “well-made poem” within a specifically English poetic;
  • North's poetics - mixture of sexual voyeurism and conflicted self-examination linking sacrificial victim of tribal violence;
  • neglected life - catalogue of “A Disused Shed in County Wexford” a poem that is a formal perfection;
  • narrative style - an experiment in The Irish For No, brilliantly elaborated in mixed mode of poetry and autobiographical prose

Summary

This chapter contains sections titled:

  • I

  • II

  • III

  • IV

  • Further Reading