9. What Verse and Verbal Art can Weave

  1. Nicholas Evans

Published Online: 30 APR 2009

DOI: 10.1002/9781444310450.ch9

Dying Words: Endangered Languages and What They Have to Tell Us

Dying Words: Endangered Languages and What They Have to Tell Us

How to Cite

Evans, N. (2009) What Verse and Verbal Art can Weave, in Dying Words: Endangered Languages and What They Have to Tell Us, Wiley-Blackwell, Oxford, UK. doi: 10.1002/9781444310450.ch9

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 30 APR 2009
  2. Published Print: 17 APR 2009

Book Series:

  1. The Language Library

Book Series Editors:

  1. David Crystal

ISBN Information

Print ISBN: 9780631233053

Online ISBN: 9781444310450

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Keywords:

  • verse and verbal art - a weave;
  • intricate rhymes and alliterative patterns of the bardic tradition;
  • intricate alliteration schemes, known as cynghanedd (pronounced kung-han-eth);
  • Cynghanedd draws or “traversing cynghanedd”;
  • cynghanedd sain or “sonorous cynghanedd”;
  • improbable bards and epic debates

Summary

This chapter contains sections titled:

  • Extraordinary Language

  • Carving with the Grain

  • Improbable Bards and Epic Debates: the Singers of Montenegro

  • The Case of Khlebnikov's Grasshopper

  • Unsung Bards of the New Guinea Highlands

  • No Spice, No Savor

  • The Great Semanticist Yellow Trevally Fish

  • An Oral Culture Always Stands One Generation Away from Extinction

  • Further reading