Chapter Six. Kings and Kingship

  1. Pauline Stafford Professor specialist
  1. Barbara Yorke Professor

Published Online: 27 APR 2009

DOI: 10.1002/9781444311020.ch6

A Companion to the Early Middle Ages: Britain and Ireland, c.500-c.1100

A Companion to the Early Middle Ages: Britain and Ireland, c.500-c.1100

How to Cite

Yorke, B. (2009) Kings and Kingship, in A Companion to the Early Middle Ages: Britain and Ireland, c.500-c.1100 (ed P. Stafford), Wiley-Blackwell, Oxford, UK. doi: 10.1002/9781444311020.ch6

Editor Information

  1. Liverpool University, UK

Author Information

  1. University of Winchester, England

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 27 APR 2009
  2. Published Print: 3 APR 2009

ISBN Information

Print ISBN: 9781405106283

Online ISBN: 9781444311020

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Keywords:

  • kings and kingship;
  • Pictish example suggests, major overlordships within Britain;
  • Overlords, demanding basic rights;
  • battles of Winwaed and Nechtansmere, indicating power of greater kings and overlords;
  • Anglo-Saxon comitatus, consisting seasoned warriors;
  • active role of Anglo-Saxon royal women, reflecting in Old English poetry;
  • kings protecting people from external threats and internal anarchy;
  • Irish and Anglo-Saxon kings, demonstrating connections with gods and ancient heroes

Summary

This chapter contains sections titled:

  • Origins and Sources

  • Kingdoms and Sub-kingdoms

  • Overlordship

  • Military Power

  • Dynasties and Royal Succession

  • Kings' Duties within their Kingdoms: Law and Religion

  • Conclusion

  • Further Reading

  • Bibliography