Chapter 3. The Appropriation of Human Remains: A First Nations Legal and Ethical Perspective

  1. James O. Young Professor and
  2. Conrad G. Brunk Professor past director
  1. James [Sákéj] Youngblood Henderson J.D. Research Director

Published Online: 24 APR 2009

DOI: 10.1002/9781444311099.ch3

The Ethics of Cultural Appropriation

The Ethics of Cultural Appropriation

How to Cite

Henderson, J. [. Y. (2009) The Appropriation of Human Remains: A First Nations Legal and Ethical Perspective, in The Ethics of Cultural Appropriation (eds J. O. Young and C. G. Brunk), Wiley-Blackwell, Oxford, UK. doi: 10.1002/9781444311099.ch3

Editor Information

  1. University of Victoria, Canada

Author Information

  1. Native Law Centre of Canada, University of Saskatchewan, Canada

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 24 APR 2009
  2. Published Print: 10 APR 2009

ISBN Information

Print ISBN: 9781405161596

Online ISBN: 9781444311099

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Keywords:

  • appropriation of human remains;
  • travelers and colonizers, collecting human remains of First Nations (FN);
  • collectors, dividing remains into human history and medical/forensic applications;
  • collections of FN human remains, raising complex issues of law and ethics;
  • federal and provincial governments and their administrative regimes, ignoring Aboriginal and treaty rights;
  • United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization (UNESCO), creating two conventions;
  • Professor Leroy Little Bear, coining ‘jagged worldviews colliding’

Summary

This chapter contains sections titled:

  • Legal Interventions

  • First Nations Remains as Protected by First Nations Heritage and Jurisprudence

  • Search for Professor Ermine's ‘Ethical Lodge’

  • Conclusion

  • References