Chapter 6. Nadia Rosenberg: A 53-Year-Old Russian Woman with Drug-Resistant Tuberculosis

  1. Lisa Hark PhD, RD Consultant2 and
  2. Horace DeLisser MD Associate Professor Assistant Dean3
  1. Elena N. Atochina-Vasserman MD, PhD Senior Research Investigator and
  2. Helen Abramova MD Postdoctoral Research Fellow

Published Online: 27 APR 2009

DOI: 10.1002/9781444311686.ch6

Achieving Cultural Competency: A Case-Based Approach to Training Health Professionals

Achieving Cultural Competency: A Case-Based Approach to Training Health Professionals

How to Cite

Atochina-Vasserman, E. N. and Abramova, H. (2009) Nadia Rosenberg: A 53-Year-Old Russian Woman with Drug-Resistant Tuberculosis, in Achieving Cultural Competency: A Case-Based Approach to Training Health Professionals (eds L. Hark and H. DeLisser), Wiley-Blackwell, Oxford, UK. doi: 10.1002/9781444311686.ch6

Editor Information

  1. 2

    Department of Medicine, Jefferson Medical College, Thomas Jefferson University, Philadelphia, PA, USA

  2. 3

    Cultural Competency and Spirituality, University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine, Philadelphia, PA, USA

Author Information

  1. Division of Pulmonary, Allergy, and Critical Care Medicine, University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine, Philadelphia, PA, USA

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 27 APR 2009
  2. Published Print: 10 APR 2009

ISBN Information

Print ISBN: 9781405180726

Online ISBN: 9781444311686

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Keywords:

  • Russian woman with drug-resistant tuberculosis;
  • importance of obtaining an interpreter;
  • long waits in an ED - source of frustration;
  • bringing an interpreter - for better diagnosis and communication;
  • sputum sample - for acid-fast bacillus (AFB) staining and culture;
  • chest x-ray - an upperlobe infiltrate - pulmonary tuberculosis (TB)

Summary

This chapter contains sections titled:

  • Given that the waits for nonemergent care in many EDs are usually long, why was Mrs. Rosenberg so impatient and decided to leave?

  • What issues might result for the patient and the physician when using a neighbor or family member as an interpreter?

  • Why would Mrs. Rosenberg say “okay” and “I understand” but fail to follow-up for further evaluation?

  • Why might Mrs. Rosenberg be so resistant to DOT for her tuberculosis?

  • Why might this request for family, friends, and other close contacts to be tested for TB be particularly upsetting to Mrs. Rosenberg?

  • Is it possible to make alternative arrangements for Mrs. Rosenberg to receive DOT for TB at home?

  • References