Chapter 1. Introduction

  1. Sharon E. Straus MD, FRCPC, MSc1,2,
  2. Jacqueline Tetroe MA3 and
  3. Ian D. Graham PhD3,4
  1. Sharon E. Straus MD, FRCPC, MSc1,2,
  2. Jacqueline Tetroe MA3 and
  3. Ian D. Graham PhD3,4

Published Online: 27 APR 2009

DOI: 10.1002/9781444311747.ch1

Knowledge Translation in Health Care: Moving from Evidence to Practice

Knowledge Translation in Health Care: Moving from Evidence to Practice

How to Cite

Straus, S. E., Tetroe, J. and Graham, I. D. (2009) Introduction, in Knowledge Translation in Health Care: Moving from Evidence to Practice (eds S. E. Straus, J. Tetroe and I. D. Graham), Wiley-Blackwell, Oxford, UK. doi: 10.1002/9781444311747.ch1

Editor Information

  1. 1

    Li Ka Shing Knowledge Institute, St. Michael's Hospital, Toronto, ON, Canada

  2. 2

    Department of Medicine, University of Toronto, Toronto, ON, Canada

  3. 3

    Knowledge Translation Portfolio, Canadian Institutes of Health Research, Ottawa, ON, Canada

  4. 4

    School of Nursing, University of Ottawa, Ottawa, ON, Canada

Author Information

  1. 1

    Li Ka Shing Knowledge Institute, St. Michael's Hospital, Toronto, ON, Canada

  2. 2

    Department of Medicine, University of Toronto, Toronto, ON, Canada

  3. 3

    Knowledge Translation Portfolio, Canadian Institutes of Health Research, Ottawa, ON, Canada

  4. 4

    School of Nursing, University of Ottawa, Ottawa, ON, Canada

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 27 APR 2009
  2. Published Print: 10 APR 2009

ISBN Information

Print ISBN: 9781405181068

Online ISBN: 9781444311747

SEARCH

Keywords:

  • knowledge to action - what it is and what it isn't;
  • evidence-based decision making (EBDM) - improving quantity, quality, and breadth of evidence used by participants in health care system;
  • understanding roots of unrealistic expectations;
  • political and institutional context of decision making;
  • decision makers' views and expectations of research communities;
  • legislative decision makers—politicians, bureaucrats, and various interest groups—using research and analysis to form policy agendas;
  • clinical decision makers—individual practitioners, specialty and professional society officials, and expert panel members—concerned with specific questions of patient selection criteria;
  • industrial decision makers—pharmaceutical companies, software and device manufacturers, and venture capitalists—interested in potentially profitable products;
  • achieving improved dissemination and uptake of health research - depending on interested applied researchers and committed decision makers

Summary

This chapter contains sections titled:

  • Knowledge to action: what it is and what it isn't