Chapter 3. Human Blood Group Systems

  1. Michael F. Murphy MD, FRCP, FRCPath Professor Consultant Haematologist2,3 and
  2. Derwood H. Pamphilon MD, MRCPCH, FRCP, FRCPath Consultant Haematologist Honorary Clinical Reader4,5
  1. Geoff Daniels PhD, FRCPath Head Senior Research Fellow

Published Online: 5 MAY 2009

DOI: 10.1002/9781444311761.ch3

Practical Transfusion Medicine, Third Edition

Practical Transfusion Medicine, Third Edition

How to Cite

Daniels, G. (2009) Human Blood Group Systems, in Practical Transfusion Medicine, Third Edition (eds M. F. Murphy and D. H. Pamphilon), Wiley-Blackwell, Oxford, UK. doi: 10.1002/9781444311761.ch3

Editor Information

  1. 2

    University of Oxford, Oxford, UK

  2. 3

    NHS Blood and Transplant and Department of Haematology, John Radcliffe Hospital, Oxford, UK

  3. 4

    NHS Blood and Transplant, Bristol, UK

  4. 5

    Department of Cellular and Molecular Medicine, University of Bristol, Bristol, UK

Author Information

  1. Bristol Institute for Transfusion Sciences, NHS Blood and Transplant, Bristol, UK

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 5 MAY 2009
  2. Published Print: 14 APR 2009

ISBN Information

Print ISBN: 9781405181969

Online ISBN: 9781444311761

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Keywords:

  • human blood group systems;
  • homologous genes;
  • red cell surface glycoproteins;
  • important blood group systems – ABO, Rh;
  • biochemically related blood group systems – H, Lewis and I;
  • prediction of fetal Rh genotype by molecular methods;
  • membrane transporters;
  • Duffy glycoprotein – chemokine receptor;
  • Cromer and Knops – protects the cells from destruction

Summary

This chapter contains sections titled:

  • The ABO system

  • The Rh system

  • Other blood group systems

  • The biological significance of blood group antigens

  • Key points

  • Further reading