Chapter 9. Biofumigation for Plant Disease Control – from the Fundamentals to the Farming System

  1. Professor Dale Walters
  1. Dr John Kirkegaard

Published Online: 19 MAY 2009

DOI: 10.1002/9781444312157.ch9

Disease Control in Crops: Biological and Environmentally Friendly Approaches

Disease Control in Crops: Biological and Environmentally Friendly Approaches

How to Cite

Kirkegaard, J. (2009) Biofumigation for Plant Disease Control – from the Fundamentals to the Farming System, in Disease Control in Crops: Biological and Environmentally Friendly Approaches (ed D. Walters), Wiley-Blackwell, Oxford, UK. doi: 10.1002/9781444312157.ch9

Editor Information

  1. Crop & Soil Systems Research Group, Scottish Agricultural College, King's Buildings, West Mains Road, Edinburgh EH9 3JG, UK

Author Information

  1. CSIRO Plant Industry, GPO Box 1600, Canberra, ACT 2601, Australia

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 19 MAY 2009
  2. Published Print: 27 MAR 2009

ISBN Information

Print ISBN: 9781405169479

Online ISBN: 9781444312157

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Keywords:

  • plant disease control biofumigation;
  • biofumigation - suppressing plant pests, notably isothiocyanates (ITCs);
  • biofumigation studies - improved soil structure, and organic matter and erosion control;
  • IPM (Integrated Pest Management) approach - to biofumigation;
  • optimizing ITC and non-ITC benefits of biofumigants;
  • glucosinolate–myrosinase system;
  • hydrolysis products - ITCs, organic cyanides, oxazolidinethiones and ionic thiocyanates;
  • rotation or intercrops - a role for root GSLs;
  • green manuring and biofumigation

Summary

This chapter contains sections titled:

  • Introduction

  • The glucosinolate–myrosinase system

  • Modes of utilization

  • Separating GSL-related suppression from other effects of biofumigants

  • Maximizing biofumigation potential

  • Release efficiency, fate and activity of hydrolysis products in soil

  • Ecological considerations

  • Field implementation

  • Summary

  • References