18. Colorectal Cancer: Population Screening and Surveillance

  1. John WD McDonald Professor of Medicine3,
  2. Andrew K Burroughs Professor of Hepatology Consultant Physician/Hepatologist4,
  3. Brian G Feagan Professor of Medicine3 and
  4. M Brian Fennerty Professor of Medicine5
  1. Theodore R Levin1 and
  2. Linda Rabeneck2

Published Online: 22 JUL 2010

DOI: 10.1002/9781444314403.ch18

Evidence-Based Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Third Edition

Evidence-Based Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Third Edition

How to Cite

Levin, T. R. and Rabeneck, L. (2010) Colorectal Cancer: Population Screening and Surveillance, in Evidence-Based Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Third Edition (eds J. W. McDonald, A. K. Burroughs, B. G. Feagan and M. B. Fennerty), Wiley-Blackwell, Oxford, UK. doi: 10.1002/9781444314403.ch18

Editor Information

  1. 3

    Robarts Clinical Trials, Robarts Research Unit, University of Western Ontario, London, Ontario, Canada

  2. 4

    The Royal Free Sheila Sherlock Liver Centre, Royal Free Hospital, and University College London, London, UK

  3. 5

    Oregon Health and Science University, Division of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Portland, Oregon, USA

Author Information

  1. 1

    The Permanente Medical Group, Inc., Walnut Creek, California, USA

  2. 2

    University of Toronto, Toronto, Canada

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 22 JUL 2010
  2. Published Print: 10 SEP 2010

ISBN Information

Print ISBN: 9781405181938

Online ISBN: 9781444314403

SEARCH

Keywords:

  • Rules of evidence and feasibility of evidence;
  • What to do when ideal evidence is lacking;
  • Colorectal cancer: an ideal target for prevention and early detection through screening;
  • Organized vs opportunistic screening;
  • Fecal occult blood testing;
  • Expected sensitivity of FITs;
  • Flexible sigmoidoscopy;
  • Radiologic screening;
  • Double contrast barium enema;
  • CT colonography (CTC) or virtual colonoscopy (VC)

Summary

This chapter contains sections titled:

  • Rules of evidence and feasibility of evidence

  • What to do when ideal evidence is lacking

  • Colorectal cancer: an ideal target for prevention and early detection through screening

  • Organized vs opportunistic screening

  • Fecal occult blood testing

  • Expected sensitivity of FITs

  • Stool DNA

  • Flexible sigmoidoscopy

  • Radiologic screening

  • Double contrast barium enema

  • CT colonography (CTC) or virtual colonoscopy (VC)

  • Colonoscopy screening

  • Implementing screening

  • Comparing guidelines

  • References