Chapter 25. New Directions in Antifouling Technology

  1. Simone Dürr3 and
  2. Jeremy C. Thomason4
  1. Dean C. Webster1 and
  2. Bret J. Chisholm2

Published Online: 29 JAN 2010

DOI: 10.1002/9781444315462.ch25

Biofouling

Biofouling

How to Cite

Webster, D. C. and Chisholm, B. J. (2009) New Directions in Antifouling Technology, in Biofouling (eds S. Dürr and J. C. Thomason), Wiley-Blackwell, Oxford, UK. doi: 10.1002/9781444315462.ch25

Editor Information

  1. 3

    School of Natural Sciences and Psychology, Liverpool John Moores University, Byrom Street, Liverpool, L3 3AF, UK

  2. 4

    School of Biology, Newcastle University, Newcastle upon Tyne, NE1 7RU, UK

Author Information

  1. 1

    Department of Coatings and Polymeric Materials, North Dakota State University, PO Box 6050, Department 2760, Fargo, ND 58108, USA

  2. 2

    Center for Nanoscale Science and Engineering, North Dakota State University, PO Box 6050, Department 4310, Fargo, ND 58108, USA

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 29 JAN 2010
  2. Published Print: 18 DEC 2009

ISBN Information

Print ISBN: 9781405169264

Online ISBN: 9781444315462

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Keywords:

  • new directions in antifouling technology;
  • biocidal coating systems - systems releasing biocidal chemicals;
  • biocidal antifouling coatings;
  • bacterial colonisation of surfaces - mechanisms for fouling deterrence;
  • diketopiperzines - having antifouling properties;
  • quaternary ammonium salts (QASs) - effective contact active biocide moieties;
  • fluoropolymers - having low surface energies;
  • silicone elastomers - poor adhesion to substrates;
  • surface topography - limiting surface area for attaching fouling organisms;
  • low-toxicity biocides - antifouling chemicals extracted from marine organisms

Summary

This chapter contains sections titled:

  • Introduction

  • Biocidal Antifouling Coatings

  • Natural Antifoulants

  • Non-toxic Non-fouling Approaches

  • Conclusions

  • References