Chapter 9. Livestock Grazing and Wildlife Conservation in the American West: Historical, Policy and Conservation Biology Perspectives

  1. Johan T. du Toit Head professor2,
  2. Richard Kock Manager3 and
  3. James C. Deutsch4
  1. Thomas L. Fleischner Professor Co-Founder President

Published Online: 10 NOV 2009

DOI: 10.1002/9781444317091.ch9

Wild Rangelands: Conserving Wildlife While Maintaining Livestock in Semi-Arid Ecosystems

Wild Rangelands: Conserving Wildlife While Maintaining Livestock in Semi-Arid Ecosystems

How to Cite

Fleischner, T. L. (2010) Livestock Grazing and Wildlife Conservation in the American West: Historical, Policy and Conservation Biology Perspectives, in Wild Rangelands: Conserving Wildlife While Maintaining Livestock in Semi-Arid Ecosystems (eds J. T. du Toit, R. Kock and J. C. Deutsch), John Wiley & Sons, Ltd, Chichester, UK. doi: 10.1002/9781444317091.ch9

Editor Information

  1. 2

    Utah State University, USA

  2. 3

    Zoological Society of London, UK

  3. 4

    Cambridge University and Imperial College, UK

Author Information

  1. Prescott College, AZ, USA

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 10 NOV 2009
  2. Published Print: 8 JAN 2010

ISBN Information

Print ISBN: 9781405177856

Online ISBN: 9781444317091

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Keywords:

  • livestock grazing and wildlife conservation in American West;
  • overgrazed prairies of the Dust Bowl;
  • livestock grazing and ecological effects;
  • livestock utilized as wildlife management tool;
  • forest stand structure changes and soil dynamics and altered fire patterns;
  • riparian habitats – essential to wildlife;
  • livestock grazing on riparian habitat and biological soil crusts;
  • livestock grazing and biological soil crust cover with species loss;
  • psychological and social contexts of stakeholders;
  • ecological and social restoration efforts in wildlife conservation

Summary

This chapter contains sections titled:

  • Introduction

  • History and policy of grazing in the American West

  • Wildlife conservation on rangelands: ecology and conservation biology play a larger role

  • Current concerns, conflicts and potential

  • Conclusion

  • References