Chapter 3. Part III: Becoming Identities

  1. Patrick O'Donnell

Published Online: 15 JAN 2010

DOI: 10.1002/9781444317893.ch3

The American Novel Now: Reading Contemporary American Fiction Since 1980

The American Novel Now: Reading Contemporary American Fiction Since 1980

How to Cite

O'Donnell, P. (2010) Part III: Becoming Identities, in The American Novel Now: Reading Contemporary American Fiction Since 1980, Wiley-Blackwell, Oxford, UK. doi: 10.1002/9781444317893.ch3

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 15 JAN 2010
  2. Published Print: 15 JAN 2010

ISBN Information

Print ISBN: 9781405167574

Online ISBN: 9781444317893

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Keywords:

  • becoming identities;
  • Erich Kahler's arguement, that modern novel is marked by its “inward turn” toward the individual subject;
  • Virginia Woolf 's Mrs. Dalloway (1925) - focusing on psychologies and interiorities of complex individuals;
  • Updike's four “Rabbit” novels, Rabbit Run - Updike's portrayal of a continuous, existential “core” identity;
  • reinventing character - element of fiction closely aligned with notion of identity as that of character;
  • Paul Auster, signature novelist of what Jeremy Green - terms “late postmodernism”;
  • subject of representing race and racial difference in literature;
  • race, becoming a trope of - ultimate, irreducible difference between cultures and linguistic groups;
  • engendering narrative - proliferating representations of gender and sexuality in American novels;
  • The Mixquiahuala Letters - novel portraying complex and conflicted female friendship, that women must bond on every level

Summary

This chapter contains sections titled:

  • Reinventing Character

  • Racing Identity

  • Engendering Narrative

  • Toward the Posthuman