Chapter 9. Development of Nurse-Led Pain Management Programmes: Meeting a Community need

  1. Eloise Carr Associate Dean2,
  2. Mandy Layzell Lecturer Practitioner Advanced Specialist Nurse3 and
  3. Martin Christensen PhD member Senior Lecturer4
  1. Dr. Dee Burrows Consultant Nurse Managing Director founder

Published Online: 21 JAN 2010

DOI: 10.1002/9781444318722.ch9

Advancing Nursing Practice in Pain Management

Advancing Nursing Practice in Pain Management

How to Cite

Burrows, D. (2010) Development of Nurse-Led Pain Management Programmes: Meeting a Community need, in Advancing Nursing Practice in Pain Management (eds E. Carr, M. Layzell and M. Christensen), Wiley-Blackwell, Oxford, UK. doi: 10.1002/9781444318722.ch9

Editor Information

  1. 2

    School of Health & Social Care, Bournemouth University, UK

  2. 3

    Acute Pain Team, Poole Hospital NHS Foundation Trust, UK

  3. 4

    School of Health & Social Care, Bournemouth House, Bournemouth University, UK

Author Information

  1. PainConsultants Limited, UK

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 21 JAN 2010
  2. Published Print: 19 FEB 2010

ISBN Information

Print ISBN: 9781405176996

Online ISBN: 9781444318722

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Keywords:

  • nurse-led pain management programmes - meeting a community need;
  • pain management programme (PMP) and associated services in independent sector;
  • learning and implementing pain management strategies;
  • contextual cognitive behavioral therapy (CCBT);
  • Pain Coping Strategy Questionnaire (PCSQ);
  • designing programme – ongoing support and evaluation of progress;
  • efficacy of CBT-based PMPs in improving pain experience, mood, coping, activity levels;
  • Royal College of Nursing's (RCN's) Nurse Entrepreneurs Group;
  • nurse entrepreneurs - turning initiative into independence;
  • maintaining standards and evaluating services

Summary

This chapter contains sections titled:

  • Introduction

  • Developing the service

  • Challenges in implementing the service

  • Maintaining standards and evaluating the service

  • Justifying the advanced nursing contribution

  • Conclusions

  • Appendix 1

  • Red flags indicative of possible serious spinal pathology

  • Psychosocial yellow flags – the beliefs and behaviours which may predict poor outcome and which pain management programmes address

  • Acknowledgements

  • References