Chapter 16. Positive Reinforcement Training for Laboratory Animals

  1. Robert Hubrecht and
  2. James Kirkwood
  1. Gail Laule

Published Online: 8 FEB 2010

DOI: 10.1002/9781444318777.ch16

The UFAW Handbook on the Care and Management of Laboratory and Other Research Animals, Eighth Edition

The UFAW Handbook on the Care and Management of Laboratory and Other Research Animals, Eighth Edition

How to Cite

Laule, G. (2010) Positive Reinforcement Training for Laboratory Animals, in The UFAW Handbook on the Care and Management of Laboratory and Other Research Animals, Eighth Edition (eds R. Hubrecht and J. Kirkwood), Wiley-Blackwell, Oxford, UK. doi: 10.1002/9781444318777.ch16

Editor Information

  1. UFAW, The Old School, Brewhouse Hill, Wheathampstead, Hertfordshire AL4 8AN, UK

Author Information

  1. Active Environments, Inc, 7651 Santos Rd., Lompoc, CA 93436, USA

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 8 FEB 2010
  2. Published Print: 26 MAR 2010

ISBN Information

Print ISBN: 9781405175234

Online ISBN: 9781444318777

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Keywords:

  • positive reinforcement training (PRT) for laboratory animals;
  • animals in captivity - deserving high standards of animal care;
  • B.F. Skinner and specific terms and techniques of operant conditioning;
  • farm animals - used in research, prime candidates for training;
  • operant conditioning - positive and negative reinforcement or escape/avoidance;
  • use of negative reinforcement - modifying and controlling behaviour;
  • shaping or successive approximation;
  • non-human primates, and stereotyped behaviours, housed in sub-optimal or inappropriate environments;
  • positive reinforcement-based animal training programme in laboratory environment;
  • using basic principles of PRT - in improving human–animal relationship

Summary

This chapter contains sections titled:

  • Introduction

  • Benefits of positive reinforcement training

  • Positive reinforcement training

  • Negative reinforcement

  • Training methods

  • Training objectives

  • Addressing fear

  • Socialisation training

  • Training programme development

  • Concluding remarks

  • References