18. Beyond the Stimulus to the “Experience”

  1. Howard R. Moskowitz Ph.D. President Founder1,
  2. Michele Reisner Vice President of Research1,
  3. John Ben Lawlor Ph.D.2 and
  4. Rosires Deliza Ph.D. Senior Research Scientist3

Published Online: 28 SEP 2009

DOI: 10.1002/9781444319330.ch18

Packaging Research in Food Product Design and Development

Packaging Research in Food Product Design and Development

How to Cite

Moskowitz, H. R., Reisner, M., Lawlor, J. B. and Deliza, R. (2009) Beyond the Stimulus to the “Experience”, in Packaging Research in Food Product Design and Development, Wiley-Blackwell, Oxford, UK. doi: 10.1002/9781444319330.ch18

Author Information

  1. 1

    Moskowitz Jacobs Inc., 1025 Westchester Avenue, 4th Floor, White Plains, New York 10604 USA

  2. 2

    GlaxoSmithKline, Nutritional Healthcare, Coleford, GL16 8JB, UK

  3. 3

    Embrapa Food Technology, Av. Das Americas, 29.501-Guardaratiba, 23022-470 Rio de Janeiro, RJ-Brazil

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 28 SEP 2009
  2. Published Print: 7 SEP 2009

ISBN Information

Print ISBN: 9780813812229

Online ISBN: 9781444319330

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Keywords:

  • beyond the stimulus to the “experience”;
  • notion of design in the world of food experience;
  • Rethinking Experimental Design for Experience (QSR);
  • Quick-Serve Restaurant (QSR);
  • working with “experience” - more problematic;
  • lists and taxonomies of feelings;
  • relevance of emotions;
  • Consumption Emotion Set (CES);
  • capturing subjective response;
  • emotions - QSR vignettes create in respondent

Summary

This chapter contains sections titled:

  • Introduction

  • Rethinking Experimental Design for Experience (QSR)

  • A Case History: “Experience” in a Quick Serve Restaurant (QSR)

  • What Are the Stimuli?

  • The Relevance of Emotions

  • What Are the Emotions?—Lists and Taxonomies of Feelings

  • Capturing the Subjective Response

  • The Overall Evaluation—What Drives the Person to Say “I'll Go Here Often?”

  • Uncovering the Emotional Contribution of the Experience

  • The Emotions Our QSR Vignettes Create in the Respondent

  • “Different Strokes for Different Folks”—Do All People React with the Same Emotions to These Elements?

  • Taking Stock So Far—What Does “Emotion Modeling” Provide Us When Combined with Experimental Design of Stimuli?

  • Statistical Appendix—Analyzing the Emotion Data—A Quick Review

  • Recoding the Data

  • Establishing Reliability—Is the Emotion Model “Repeatable?”

  • References