Chapter 21. German Legal Philosophy and Theory in the Nineteenth and Twentieth Centuries

  1. Dennis Patterson Professor2,3,4
  1. Alexander Somek Professor

Published Online: 27 JAN 2010

DOI: 10.1002/9781444320114.ch21

A Companion to Philosophy of Law and Legal Theory, Second edition

A Companion to Philosophy of Law and Legal Theory, Second edition

How to Cite

Somek, A. (2010) German Legal Philosophy and Theory in the Nineteenth and Twentieth Centuries, in A Companion to Philosophy of Law and Legal Theory, Second edition (ed D. Patterson), Wiley-Blackwell, Oxford, UK. doi: 10.1002/9781444320114.ch21

Editor Information

  1. 2

    European University Institute, Florence, Italy

  2. 3

    Rutgers University School of Law, Camden, New Jersey, USA

  3. 4

    Swansea University, Wales, United Kingdom

Author Information

  1. Charles E. Floete Chair in Law, the University of Iowa College of Law, Iowa City, Iowa, USA

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 27 JAN 2010
  2. Published Print: 19 MAR 2010

ISBN Information

Print ISBN: 9781405170062

Online ISBN: 9781444320114

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Keywords:

  • German legal philosophy and theory - in nineteenth and twentieth centuries;
  • nineteenth-century idealism and Immanuel Kant's writings;
  • Georg Wilhelm Friedrich Hegel's Philosophy of Right;
  • Fichte argues, self-awareness as identity of unconditional spontaneity and its reflection on itself;
  • idealism to nineteenth-century constructivism;
  • turn of the century to World War II - disintegration and reconstruction;
  • Kelsen's disciple Fritz Sander - radicalizing dynamic model of pure theory of law;
  • period from 1945 to the present - from natural law to postmodernism;
  • Nazi past - stifling effects on German legal thought;
  • “postmodernist” approaches to law and society - under the guise of social systems theory

Summary

This chapter contains sections titled:

  • Nineteenth-Century Idealism

  • From Idealism to Nineteenth-Century Constructivism: The Case of the Historical School

  • From the Turn of the Century to World War II: Disintegration and Reconstruction

  • The Period from 1933 to 1945: “Völkische” Jurisprudence

  • The Period from 1945 to the Present: From Natural Law to Postmodernism

  • References