Chapter 46. Coercion

  1. Dennis Patterson Professor2,3,4
  1. Grant Lamond

Published Online: 27 JAN 2010

DOI: 10.1002/9781444320114.ch46

A Companion to Philosophy of Law and Legal Theory, Second edition

A Companion to Philosophy of Law and Legal Theory, Second edition

How to Cite

Lamond, G. (2010) Coercion, in A Companion to Philosophy of Law and Legal Theory, Second edition (ed D. Patterson), Wiley-Blackwell, Oxford, UK. doi: 10.1002/9781444320114.ch46

Editor Information

  1. 2

    European University Institute, Florence, Italy

  2. 3

    Rutgers University School of Law, Camden, New Jersey, USA

  3. 4

    Swansea University, Wales, United Kingdom

Author Information

  1. University Lecturer in Legal Philosophy and Felix Frankfurter Fellow in Law, Balliol College, Oxford University, UK

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 27 JAN 2010
  2. Published Print: 19 MAR 2010

ISBN Information

Print ISBN: 9781405170062

Online ISBN: 9781444320114

SEARCH

Keywords:

  • coercion mattering to law for two reasons - affecting people's legal liabilities;
  • law employing, both physical force and sanctions;
  • coercion, form of social power over others - made to act even if they do not wish to do so;
  • different means of coercing another and different roles - claims of coercion in normative thought;
  • When is a threat coercive - in unpleasant outcomes as revenge;
  • preference approach - as a major variation of baseline approach;
  • Is rational compulsion morally problematic - coercion, commonly thought to be morally problematic;
  • relationship between law and coercion;
  • coercion and nature of law;
  • links between law and coercion - sought in the law's claim to authority

Summary

This chapter contains sections titled:

  • Coercion

  • Law

  • References