Chapter 5. Generalisability, Transferability, Complexity and Relevance

  1. Ian Shemilt Senior Research Associate5,
  2. Miranda Mugford Professor5,
  3. Luke Vale Professor6,
  4. Kevin Marsh Head7 and
  5. Cam Donaldson Yunus Chair NIHR Senior Investigator8
  1. Damian G. Walker Associate Professor1,
  2. Yot Teerawattananon Program Leader2,
  3. Rob Anderson Senior Lecturer3 and
  4. Gerry Richardson Senior Research Fellow4

Published Online: 5 MAY 2010

DOI: 10.1002/9781444320398.ch5

Evidence-Based Decisions and Economics: Health Care, Social Welfare, Education and Criminal Justice, Second Edition

Evidence-Based Decisions and Economics: Health Care, Social Welfare, Education and Criminal Justice, Second Edition

How to Cite

Walker, D. G., Teerawattananon, Y., Anderson, R. and Richardson, G. (2010) Generalisability, Transferability, Complexity and Relevance, in Evidence-Based Decisions and Economics: Health Care, Social Welfare, Education and Criminal Justice, Second Edition (eds I. Shemilt, M. Mugford, L. Vale, K. Marsh and C. Donaldson), Wiley-Blackwell, Oxford, UK. doi: 10.1002/9781444320398.ch5

Editor Information

  1. 5

    School of Medicine, Health Policy and Practice, University of East Anglia, Norwich, UK

  2. 6

    Health Economics Research Unit and Health Services Research Unit, University of Aberdeen, Aberdeen, UK

  3. 7

    The Matrix Knowledge Group, London, UK

  4. 8

    Glasgow Caledonian University, Glasgow, UK

Author Information

  1. 1

    Johns Hopkins University, Bloomberg School of Public Health, Baltimore, MD, USA

  2. 2

    Health Intervention and Technology Assessment Program (HITAP), Thai Ministry of Public Health, Nonthaburi, Thailand

  3. 3

    Peninsula Medical School, University of Exeter, Exeter, UK

  4. 4

    Centre for Health Economics, University of York, York, UK

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 5 MAY 2010
  2. Published Print: 9 APR 2010

ISBN Information

Print ISBN: 9781405191531

Online ISBN: 9781444320398

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Keywords:

  • generalisability, transferability, complexity and relevance - cost- effectiveness data;
  • overall incremental cost-effectiveness ratio (ICER);
  • generalisability and transferability with respect to economic analysis;
  • transferability - ability to extrapolate results obtained;
  • importance of generalisability for producers, users and funders;
  • factors affecting generalisability - population factors;
  • transferring economic evaluation data - methods;
  • checklists for assessing generalisability of economic evaluations;
  • complexity and economic evidence

Summary

This chapter contains sections titled:

  • Introduction

  • Terminology

  • Why is generalisability important?

  • Factors affecting generalisability

  • Methods used for transferring economic evaluation data

  • Complexity and economic evidence

  • Relevance of evidence

  • Conclusion

  • References