Chapter 10. Unspeakable Fears: Politics and Style in the Enlightenment

  1. Paul Lauter president
  1. Frank Shuffelton Professor

Published Online: 16 MAR 2010

DOI: 10.1002/9781444320626.ch10

A Companion to American Literature and Culture

A Companion to American Literature and Culture

How to Cite

Shuffelton, F. (2010) Unspeakable Fears: Politics and Style in the Enlightenment, in A Companion to American Literature and Culture (ed P. Lauter), Wiley-Blackwell, Oxford, UK. doi: 10.1002/9781444320626.ch10

Editor Information

  1. Trinity College (Hartford), UK

Author Information

  1. University of Rochester, USA

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 16 MAR 2010
  2. Published Print: 26 MAR 2010

ISBN Information

Print ISBN: 9780631208921

Online ISBN: 9781444320626

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Keywords:

  • unspeakable fears - politics and style in the Enlightenment;
  • historians of early America, assuming that the Enlightenment - a European phenomenon, mostly French, and America able to escape shackles of feudalism;
  • Henry May's The Enlightenment in America, recognizing the existence of an American Enlightenment;
  • Max Horkheimer and Theodore W. Adorno's 1944 - Dialectic of Enlightenment, as an instrumental appropriation of nature;
  • English Enlightenment, confluence of ideas and political innovations beginning with Bacon, Locke, Newton;
  • James Franklin, offending authorities with political criticism in the Courant;
  • Franklin's Silence Dogood letters - sketching out ironic, skeptical strategy that Franklin would come back to again and again;
  • “Temple of LEARNING”- blockheads taught “how to carry themselves handsomely and to enter a room genteely”;
  • Dogood, Polly Baker, and Father Abraham - pointing to Franklin's techniques of political manipulation and control

Summary

This chapter contains sections titled:

  • I

  • II

  • III

  • References and Further Reading