Chapter 21. Realism and Victorian Protestantism in African-American Literature

  1. Paul Lauter president
  1. Phillip M. Richards professor fellow

Published Online: 16 MAR 2010

DOI: 10.1002/9781444320626.ch21

A Companion to American Literature and Culture

A Companion to American Literature and Culture

How to Cite

Richards, P. M. (2010) Realism and Victorian Protestantism in African-American Literature, in A Companion to American Literature and Culture (ed P. Lauter), Wiley-Blackwell, Oxford, UK. doi: 10.1002/9781444320626.ch21

Editor Information

  1. Trinity College (Hartford), UK

Author Information

  1. Colgate University, USA

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 16 MAR 2010
  2. Published Print: 26 MAR 2010

ISBN Information

Print ISBN: 9780631208921

Online ISBN: 9781444320626

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Keywords:

  • realism and Victorian Protestantism in African-American Literature;
  • African-American literature, displaying cultural continuity between traditional Protestant piety and tentative romanticism;
  • black encounter with realism - deep anxiety over intellectual legitimacy of religious forms;
  • unfinished serialized novel Blake, Delaney presenting Blake, as an articulate privileged slave who has served his master well;
  • Linda Brent in Incidents in the Life of a Slave Girl - beginning her life in a permissive paternalistic bondage, allowing her access to her mother and father;
  • within context of Protestant tradition - through nineteenth-century African-American culture;
  • hopeful outlook toward uplift - sentimental black novels, as Charles Chesnutt, the main continuity of black Victorian culture;
  • distinction between late nineteenth-century women's novels and realistic fictions - as Charles Chesnutt's The Marrow of Tradition or Paul Dunbar's The Sport of the Gods;
  • Washington, playing the role of the providentially determined hero, nevertheless maneuvering around a complex set of political realities