Chapter 25. The Early Modern Writers of the US South

  1. Paul Lauter president
  1. John Lowe Professor Director

Published Online: 16 MAR 2010

DOI: 10.1002/9781444320626.ch25

A Companion to American Literature and Culture

A Companion to American Literature and Culture

How to Cite

Lowe, J. (2010) The Early Modern Writers of the US South, in A Companion to American Literature and Culture (ed P. Lauter), Wiley-Blackwell, Oxford, UK. doi: 10.1002/9781444320626.ch25

Editor Information

  1. Trinity College (Hartford), UK

Author Information

  1. Louisiana State University, USA

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 16 MAR 2010
  2. Published Print: 26 MAR 2010

ISBN Information

Print ISBN: 9780631208921

Online ISBN: 9781444320626

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Keywords:

  • The Early Modern Writers of the US South;
  • “The Sahara of the Bozart,” United States South having an extensive literary history;
  • post-bellum “romance of reunion” shaping the “plantation school” writings;
  • Southerners prepared for the onslaught - having seen families, farms, towns and cities devastated or even destroyed;
  • Atlanta's Henry Grady, as editor of the Atlanta Constitution - pushing the case for the “New South,” a cause championed by Tuskegee's Booker T. Washington;
  • Toomer's novel, most dramatic effect among writers of the Harlem Renaissance;
  • like Faulkner - memory, sexuality, and family conflicts lying at the heart of his long novels;
  • Richard Wright, brutal indignities in his poverty-stricken early years in Mississippi - Black Boy, never had a secure racial identity;
  • searing stories in Uncle Tom's Children (1938), forcing the reader to stare directly into the South's horrifying racial practices;
  • All the King's Men (1946) - fictionalized version of the short but electrifying career of Louisiana's home-grown, baby-faced Governor – and then Senator–Huey Long

Summary

This chapter contains sections titled:

  • References and Further Reading