Chapter 31. Narrating Terror and Trauma: Racial Formations and “Homeland Security” in Ethnic American Literature

  1. Paul Lauter president
  1. Shirley Geok-lin Lim PhD Professor

Published Online: 16 MAR 2010

DOI: 10.1002/9781444320626.ch31

A Companion to American Literature and Culture

A Companion to American Literature and Culture

How to Cite

Geok-lin Lim, S. (2010) Narrating Terror and Trauma: Racial Formations and “Homeland Security” in Ethnic American Literature, in A Companion to American Literature and Culture (ed P. Lauter), Wiley-Blackwell, Oxford, UK. doi: 10.1002/9781444320626.ch31

Editor Information

  1. Trinity College (Hartford), UK

Author Information

  1. University of California, Santa Barbara, USA

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 16 MAR 2010
  2. Published Print: 26 MAR 2010

ISBN Information

Print ISBN: 9780631208921

Online ISBN: 9781444320626

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Keywords:

  • narrating terror and trauma - racial formations and “homeland security” in ethnic American Literature;
  • race identities imagined in American ethnic texts;
  • D'Arcy McNickle's The Surrounded, Carlos Bulosan's America is in the Heart, John Okada's No-No Boy, N. Scott Momaday's House Made of Dawn, Maxine Hong Kingston's The Woman Warrior and China Men;
  • actions and character, an anti-bildungsroman - in which characters and their often broken bodies are produced through trauma;
  • wounding of individuals and communities characterized as “nonwhite” - related to now-medicalized condition known as Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD);
  • “Homeland security,” evoking image of a domestic territory under siege;
  • In McNickle's The Surrounded and Momaday's House Made of Dawn - Archilde Leon and Abel being wounded male characters;
  • stratification and heteroglossia insuring dynamics of linguistic life;
  • In China Men, progressive narrative - counters, seen to underlie that other narrative of terror and trauma;
  • Bulosan's putative autobiographical text - retelling incidents of violence against the Pinoys, first-generation Filipino-American men

Summary

This chapter contains sections titled:

  • Notes

  • References and Further Reading