Chapter 16. Sociology and Anthropology of Islam

A Critical Debate

  1. Bryan s. Turner Professor leader Director member Fellow
  1. Gabriele Marranci Fellow

Published Online: 1 MAR 2010

DOI: 10.1002/9781444320787.ch16

The New Blackwell Companion to the Sociology of Religion

The New Blackwell Companion to the Sociology of Religion

How to Cite

Marranci, G. (2010) Sociology and Anthropology of Islam, in The New Blackwell Companion to the Sociology of Religion (ed B. s. Turner), Wiley-Blackwell, Oxford, UK. doi: 10.1002/9781444320787.ch16

Editor Information

  1. Wellesley College USA

Author Information

  1. Asia Research Institute, National University of Singapore

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 1 MAR 2010
  2. Published Print: 9 APR 2010

ISBN Information

Print ISBN: 9781405188524

Online ISBN: 9781444320787

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Keywords:

  • sociology and anthropology of Islam - a critical debate;
  • Islam, a monotheistic religion and part of so-called Abrahamic family - Jews, Christians and Muslims having faith in the same God;
  • Qur'an, most sacred source of Islam - and Prophet Muhammad as the perfect example of what it means to be Muslim;
  • sociology and anthropology of Islam debated;
  • Weber's incomplete macro-sociological attempt - ultimate explanation of Islam as a cultural and social system;
  • from the village to global village - “exotic” ethnographies ending entangled in kinship, sufi saints and segmentary theories;
  • 9/11, Islam, and fundamentalism, events triggering 9/11 - Why an increase of Islamic radicalism;
  • eurocentric historical evolutionarism;
  • gender and ISLAM - not only women - Muslim women, attracting attention of the west

Summary

This chapter contains sections titled:

  • Islam: the Historical Facts

  • Sociology and Anthropology of Islam Debated

  • From the Village to Global Village

  • 9/11, Islam, and Fundamentalism

  • Gender and Islam: not Only Women

  • Conclusion

  • Bibliography