Chapter 11. Cognitive Disability, Paternalism, and the Global Burden of Disease

  1. Eva Feder Kittay Distinguished Professor senior fellow2 and
  2. Licia Carlson Ph.D. assistant professor3
  1. Daniel Wikler

Published Online: 18 AUG 2010

DOI: 10.1002/9781444322781.ch11

Cognitive Disability and Its Challenge to Moral Philosophy

Cognitive Disability and Its Challenge to Moral Philosophy

How to Cite

Wikler, D. (2010) Cognitive Disability, Paternalism, and the Global Burden of Disease, in Cognitive Disability and Its Challenge to Moral Philosophy (eds E. F. Kittay and L. Carlson), Wiley-Blackwell, Oxford, UK. doi: 10.1002/9781444322781.ch11

Editor Information

  1. 2

    Stony Brook University/SUNY, USA

  2. 3

    Providence College, USA

Author Information

  1. Harvard School of Public Health, USA

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 18 AUG 2010
  2. Published Print: 14 MAY 2010

Book Series:

  1. Metaphilosophy Series in Philosophy

Book Series Editors:

  1. Armen T. Marsoobian,
  2. Brian J. Huschle and
  3. Eric Cavallero

ISBN Information

Print ISBN: 9781405198288

Online ISBN: 9781444322781

SEARCH

Keywords:

  • cognitive disability, paternalism, and global burden of disease;
  • social justice, set of principles - human adults, enjoying average or better cognitive function;
  • adults of normal intelligence - without obtaining consent of anyone, valuing autonomy;
  • question of cognitive “competence” and decision-making authority;
  • restricting civil liberties of cognitively disabled;
  • persons of normal intelligence - danger or risk to their own interests;
  • standard liberal principle, doing as we please - as long as interests of others are not unfairly threatened;
  • cognitively disabled persons, a threat to their own welfare - not in itself sufficient reason to deny them liberty to do so;
  • conceptions of competence - relativism, mental capacity, admitting of “more” and “less”;
  • civil liberties in era of biotechnological enhancement

Summary

This chapter contains sections titled:

  • The Case for Restricting the Civil Liberties of the Cognitively Disabled

  • Two Conceptions of Competence

  • Further Topics

  • Editor's Note