Chapter 22. The Personal Is Philosophical Is Political: A Philosopher and Mother of a Cognitively Disabled Person Sends Notes from the Battlefield

  1. Eva Feder Kittay Distinguished Professor senior fellow1 and
  2. Licia Carlson Ph.D. assistant professor2
  1. Eva Feder Kittay Distinguished Professor senior fellow

Published Online: 18 AUG 2010

DOI: 10.1002/9781444322781.ch22

Cognitive Disability and Its Challenge to Moral Philosophy

Cognitive Disability and Its Challenge to Moral Philosophy

How to Cite

Kittay, E. F. (2010) The Personal Is Philosophical Is Political: A Philosopher and Mother of a Cognitively Disabled Person Sends Notes from the Battlefield, in Cognitive Disability and Its Challenge to Moral Philosophy (eds E. F. Kittay and L. Carlson), Wiley-Blackwell, Oxford, UK. doi: 10.1002/9781444322781.ch22

Editor Information

  1. 1

    Stony Brook University/SUNY, USA

  2. 2

    Providence College, USA

Author Information

  1. Stony Brook University/SUNY, USA

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 18 AUG 2010
  2. Published Print: 14 MAY 2010

Book Series:

  1. Metaphilosophy Series in Philosophy

Book Series Editors:

  1. Armen T. Marsoobian,
  2. Brian J. Huschle and
  3. Eric Cavallero

ISBN Information

Print ISBN: 9781405198288

Online ISBN: 9781444322781

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Keywords:

  • personal is philosophical and political - philosopher and mother of a cognitively disabled person sends notes from the battlefield;
  • philosophy, making claims about distinctive human capacities;
  • philosophical and practical payoffs - making philosophy personal;
  • philosophical positions, in absence of any representation - by people with disabilities or by their families;
  • philosophical inquiry, both intrinsically and instrumentally important;
  • paradox of trying to study another subject - turning subjects into an object;
  • epistemic responsibility and credibility;
  • epistemic responsibility - knowing the subject that you are using to make a philosophical point, and epistemic modesty;
  • epistemic modesty - know what you don't know;
  • human being's ontological status - and corresponding moral status, acknowledged by the larger society

Summary

This chapter contains sections titled:

  • Introduction

  • What Is the Problem? Why Try to Change the Profession?

  • The Challenges

  • Epistemic Responsibility and Credibility

  • Why the Personal Is Philosophical Is Political

  • References