Chapter 7. Duties of Justice to Citizens with Cognitive Disabilities

  1. Eva Feder Kittay Distinguished Professor senior fellow2 and
  2. Licia Carlson Ph.D. assistant professor3
  1. Sophia Isako Wong Ph.D. associate professor

Published Online: 18 AUG 2010

DOI: 10.1002/9781444322781.ch7

Cognitive Disability and Its Challenge to Moral Philosophy

Cognitive Disability and Its Challenge to Moral Philosophy

How to Cite

Wong, S. I. (2010) Duties of Justice to Citizens with Cognitive Disabilities, in Cognitive Disability and Its Challenge to Moral Philosophy (eds E. F. Kittay and L. Carlson), Wiley-Blackwell, Oxford, UK. doi: 10.1002/9781444322781.ch7

Editor Information

  1. 2

    Stony Brook University/SUNY, USA

  2. 3

    Providence College, USA

Author Information

  1. Long Island University in Brooklyn, New York, USA

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 18 AUG 2010
  2. Published Print: 14 MAY 2010

Book Series:

  1. Metaphilosophy Series in Philosophy

Book Series Editors:

  1. Armen T. Marsoobian,
  2. Brian J. Huschle and
  3. Eric Cavallero

ISBN Information

Print ISBN: 9781405198288

Online ISBN: 9781444322781

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Keywords:

  • duties of justice to citizens with cognitive disabilities;
  • theory of distributive justice, allocating goods - by members of society in common;
  • successful theory of distributive justice - scope, identifying group of individuals to which its principles apply;
  • Rawls's theory of justice - not interpreted as treating citizens labeled with cognitive disabilities differently from “nondisabled”;
  • Rawlsian theory of justice, treating citizens - labeled with cognitive disabilities differently from other citizens;
  • scope of moral personhood;
  • human beings, needing specific Enabling Conditions - and two moral powers;
  • personhood, requiring enabling conditions;
  • blocking developmental pathways - to moral personhood;
  • marginal cases and argument from species-potential

Summary

This chapter contains sections titled:

  • Defining the Term “Citizens Labeled with Cognitive Disabilities”

  • The Scope of Moral Personhood: The Potentiality View

  • The Fully Cooperating Assumption

  • How Are the Two Moral Powers Acquired?

  • The Enabling Conditions

  • Personhood as Requiring Enabling Conditions

  • Blocking Developmental Pathways to Moral Personhood

  • The Causal Relationship Between Epistemic Claims and the Concrete Lives of People with Disabilities

  • First Objection: Responding to the Epistemic Difficulty

  • Second Objection: The Argument from Marginal Cases

  • Conclusion

  • Acknowledgments

  • References