Chapter 17. Managing the Effects of Climate Change: Fishery Management's Greatest Challenge

  1. Paul Kemp
  1. David Solomon1 and
  2. Graham Lightfoot2

Published Online: 19 MAY 2010

DOI: 10.1002/9781444323337.ch17

Salmonid Fisheries: Freshwater Habitat Management

Salmonid Fisheries: Freshwater Habitat Management

How to Cite

Solomon, D. and Lightfoot, G. (2010) Managing the Effects of Climate Change: Fishery Management's Greatest Challenge, in Salmonid Fisheries: Freshwater Habitat Management (ed P. Kemp), Wiley-Blackwell, Oxford, UK. doi: 10.1002/9781444323337.ch17

Editor Information

  1. International Centre for Ecohydraulic Research and the Centre for Salmonid Research, School of Civil Engineering and the Environment, University of Southampton, UK

Author Information

  1. 1

    Foundry Farm, Kiln Lane, Redlynch, Salisbury, Wiltshire, SP5 2HT, UK

  2. 2

    Environment Agency, Rivers House, Sunrise Business Park, Higher Shaftesbury Road, Blandford forum, Dorset, DT11 8ST, UK

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 19 MAY 2010
  2. Published Print: 2 JUL 2010

ISBN Information

Print ISBN: 9781405183963

Online ISBN: 9781444323337

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Keywords:

  • climate change effects management - fishery management's greatest challenge;
  • salmon and trout in chalk streams of southern England - lowland distribution of species in Europe;
  • Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar) - in chalk streams of southern England;
  • Atlantic salmon, as far south as Northern Spain and Portugal;
  • thermal biology of Atlantic salmon and temperature tolerance;
  • Central England Temperature (CET) - by UK Meteorological Office Hadley Centre for Climate Change;
  • northward shifts in distribution;
  • chalk stream management - channelization and undergrowth clearance from valley floor;
  • chalk streams and temperature regime - marginal for salmonids, becoming less benign

Summary

This chapter contains sections titled:

  • Summary

  • Introduction

  • The southern limit of lowl and distribution

  • Temperature tolerance

  • Evidence of and predictions for temperature changes

  • Northward shifts in distribution

  • The limited scope for mitigation

  • Conclusion

  • References