Chapter 5. What Counts Cannot be Counted: Community Engagement as a Catalyst for Emotional Intelligence

  1. Mick McKeown Principal Lecturer1,
  2. Lisa Malihi-Shoja2 and
  3. Soo Downe Professor of Midwifery Studies3

Published Online: 11 MAY 2010

DOI: 10.1002/9781444323764.ch5

Service User and Carer Involvement in Education for Health and Social Care

Service User and Carer Involvement in Education for Health and Social Care

How to Cite

McKeown, M., Malihi-Shoja, L. and Downe, S. (2010) What Counts Cannot be Counted: Community Engagement as a Catalyst for Emotional Intelligence, in Service User and Carer Involvement in Education for Health and Social Care, Wiley-Blackwell, Oxford, UK. doi: 10.1002/9781444323764.ch5

Author Information

  1. 1

    Mental Health Division, School of Nursing & Caring Science, University of Central Lancashire, Preston & Comensus, UK

  2. 2

    Comensus, Faculty of Health, University of Central Lancashire, Preston, UK

  3. 3

    School of Public Health & Clinical Sciences, University of Central Lancashire, Preston, UK

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 11 MAY 2010
  2. Published Print: 9 JUL 2010

ISBN Information

Print ISBN: 9781405184328

Online ISBN: 9781444323764

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Keywords:

  • what counts cannot be counted – community engagement as a catalyst for emotional intelligence;
  • purpose of engagement strategies – awareness raising about a range of specific health and social care conditions and circumstances;
  • private businesses and institutions are highly and directly motivated by the opinions of their core users, as this is the best way of maximising profit;
  • outcomes focused on - student satisfaction, academic achievement, quality control of timetables, course approvals and modes of assessment; and fulfilment of the targets set by funders and governments;
  • health and social care education - passive learning styles;
  • cognitive theories of education - gestalt psychologists;
  • Kohlberg's theory of moral reasoning - useful analysis of move from simple to complex moral awareness

Summary

This chapter contains sections titled:

  • Introduction

  • Defining the Stakeholders

  • What Outcomes Matter?

  • The Purpose of Health and Social Care Education

  • Addressing the Attitudinal/Values Axis

  • Developing the Moral Practitioner: Story as Praxis

  • Towards a Unifying Theory of the Effect of Service User Engagement