Chapter 6. Re-Performing the Dark Night of the Soul

Memory and Liturgy

  1. Jonathan Tran

Published Online: 8 APR 2010

DOI: 10.1002/9781444324129.ch6

The Vietnam War and Theologies of Memory: Time and Eternity in the Far Country

The Vietnam War and Theologies of Memory: Time and Eternity in the Far Country

How to Cite

Tran, J. (2010) Re-Performing the Dark Night of the Soul, in The Vietnam War and Theologies of Memory: Time and Eternity in the Far Country, Wiley-Blackwell, Oxford, UK. doi: 10.1002/9781444324129.ch6

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 8 APR 2010
  2. Published Print: 16 APR 2010

ISBN Information

Print ISBN: 9781405183208

Online ISBN: 9781444324129

SEARCH

Keywords:

  • re-performing the dark night of the soul - memory and liturgy;
  • re-narration being dangerous - unless articulated within set of practices correlative of communal life committed to truthfulness;
  • Achilles in Vietnam - Combat Trauma and the Undoing of Character, Jonathan Shay's Healing from trauma depending upon communalization of the trauma;
  • Peter Atkins's study Memory and Liturgy - of how human faculty of memory functions in the experience of Christian liturgy;
  • repetitive training, instinctive actions and reactions of a soldier - transforming a civilian into something else;
  • incomplete killers - “Roger” remembering the killings, as severe psychological trauma becoming a distinct possibility;
  • Heidegger's portrayal of a world collapse - “trapped together in a real-world reenactment of The Lord of the Flies … ”;
  • military defeat, the greatest barrier to the soldier's recovery;
  • rival liturgies - The Moral Treatment of Returning Warriors in Early Medieval and Modern Times;
  • Bernard J. Verkamp's revisitation of penitential practices of returning soldiers

Summary

This chapter contains sections titled:

  • Two Views of Liturgical Memory

  • Liturgies of War

  • Incomplete Killers

  • Rival Liturgies

  • God's Acting on Time

  • “Out of the Night”