Chapter 6. Conserving Invertebrates: How Many can be Saved, and How?

  1. Nigel Leader-Williams Professor of Biodiversity Management Director2,
  2. William M. Adams2 and
  3. Robert J. Smith Research Fellow Senior Fellow3
  1. Michael J. Samways PhD Professor Chair Fellow Member

Published Online: 3 AUG 2010

DOI: 10.1002/9781444324907.ch6

Trade-Offs in Conservation: Deciding What to Save

Trade-Offs in Conservation: Deciding What to Save

How to Cite

Samways, M. J. (2010) Conserving Invertebrates: How Many can be Saved, and How?, in Trade-Offs in Conservation: Deciding What to Save (eds N. Leader-Williams, W. M. Adams and R. J. Smith), Wiley-Blackwell, Chichester, UK. doi: 10.1002/9781444324907.ch6

Editor Information

  1. 2

    Department of Geography, University of Cambridge, Downing Place, Cambridge CB2 3EN, UK

  2. 3

    Durrell Institute of Conservation and Ecology, School of Anthropology and Conservation, Marlowe Building, University of Kent, Canterbury CT2 7NR, UK

Author Information

  1. Department of Conservation Ecology and Entomology, University of Stellenbosch, South Africa

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 3 AUG 2010
  2. Published Print: 10 SEP 2010

ISBN Information

Print ISBN: 9781405193832

Online ISBN: 9781444324907

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Keywords:

  • value system influence;
  • invertebrate conservation - how many saved, and how;
  • constructive plan needs, in place - softening extinction crisis;
  • global hotspots in the world - for invertebrate conservation;
  • invertebrate conservation - two ‘great challenges’ - ‘perception challenge’ and ‘taxonomic challenge’;
  • human bias in favour of pretty invertebrates - utilitarian ethics, even though non-consumptive;
  • taxonomic challenge relevant to large and glamorous - as butterflies and dragonflies;
  • ecosystem restoration triage conceptual model;
  • synthetic management approach for invertebrates and other biodiversity;
  • single-species approaches - overlain on landscape-scale approach

Summary

This chapter contains sections titled:

  • Introduction

  • Seeking generalizations for invertebrate conservation

  • Valuing invertebrates

  • The importance of invertebrates

  • The ‘great challenges’

  • After systematic conservation planning, then what?

  • Synthetic management approach for invertebrates and other biodiversity

  • How many invertebrates are going to be saved?

  • Conclusions

  • Acknowledgments

  • References