Chapter 24. The Empathizing-Systematizing (E-S) Theory of Autism

A Cognitive Developmental Account

  1. Usha Goswami
  1. Simon Baron-Cohen

Published Online: 15 JUL 2010

DOI: 10.1002/9781444325485.ch24

The Wiley-Blackwell Handbook of Childhood Cognitive Development, Second edition

The Wiley-Blackwell Handbook of Childhood Cognitive Development, Second edition

How to Cite

Baron-Cohen, S. (2010) The Empathizing-Systematizing (E-S) Theory of Autism, in The Wiley-Blackwell Handbook of Childhood Cognitive Development, Second edition (ed U. Goswami), Wiley-Blackwell, Oxford, UK. doi: 10.1002/9781444325485.ch24

Editor Information

  1. University of Cambridge, UK

Author Information

  1. Autism Research Centre, Department of Psychiatry, Cambridge University, UK

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 15 JUL 2010
  2. Published Print: 16 AUG 2010

ISBN Information

Print ISBN: 9781405191166

Online ISBN: 9781444325485

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Keywords:

  • Empathizing-Systematizing (E-S) Theory of Autism - cognitive developmental account;
  • classic autism and Asperger syndrome - three core diagnostic features, difficulties in social development;
  • notion of autistic spectrum - sharp separation from “normality”;
  • Mindblindness Theory - children with autism spectrum conditions, delayed in developing a theory of mind (ToM);
  • child version of reading the mind in eyes test and adult version of reading the mind in the eyes test;
  • Empathizing-Systemizing (E-S) Theory;
  • E-S theory, autism and Asperger syndrome - best explained not just with reference to empathy;
  • Weak Central Coherence (WCC) theory - E-S theory, about a different cognitive style;
  • hyper-systemizing - implications for intervention;
  • E-S theory, how study of cognitive development in atypical population - explains otherwise disparate features

Summary

This chapter contains sections titled:

  • The Mindblindness Theory

  • The Empathizing-Systemizing (E-S) Theory

  • The Extreme Male Brain Theory

  • The Autistic Mind: In Search of “Truth”

  • Hyper-Systemizing: Implications for Intervention

  • References