Chapter 5. Born to Categorize

  1. Usha Goswami
  1. Paul C. Quinn

Published Online: 15 JUL 2010

DOI: 10.1002/9781444325485.ch5

The Wiley-Blackwell Handbook of Childhood Cognitive Development, Second edition

The Wiley-Blackwell Handbook of Childhood Cognitive Development, Second edition

How to Cite

Quinn, P. C. (2010) Born to Categorize, in The Wiley-Blackwell Handbook of Childhood Cognitive Development, Second edition (ed U. Goswami), Wiley-Blackwell, Oxford, UK. doi: 10.1002/9781444325485.ch5

Editor Information

  1. University of Cambridge, UK

Author Information

  1. University of Delaware, USA

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 15 JUL 2010
  2. Published Print: 16 AUG 2010

ISBN Information

Print ISBN: 9781405191166

Online ISBN: 9781444325485

SEARCH

Keywords:

  • born to categorize;
  • concept of categorization, mental ability as “the primitive in all behavior and mental functioning”;
  • mind–brain system - categorizing experience;
  • evidence of categorization by infants;
  • global-to-basic category development;
  • young infants participating in familiarization - novelty preference tasks, forming global category representations;
  • continuity-based approach - evidence from computational simulation;
  • category development, distinguishing between perceptual competences of infants and the conceptual structures of children and adults;
  • role for experience - representations for humans versus non-human animals;
  • infants, endowed with tools - to build a foundation for conceptual development

Summary

This chapter contains sections titled:

  • Categorization: A Foundation for Cognition

  • Historical Perspective: Traditional Views

  • Evidence of Categorization by Infants

  • Neural Correlates as Evidenced with an Event-Related Potential Methodology

  • Global-to-Basic Category Development: Two Systems of Category Representation?

  • A Continuity-Based Approach: Evidence from Computational Simulation

  • Out of Infancy - The Transition to Child and Adult Concepts

  • Is Category Learning Assisted by Biases? Evidence from Eye-Tracking

  • A Role for Experience: Representations for Humans Versus Non-Human Animals

  • Not All Humans Are Learned Equally: Further Evidence on the Role of Experience

  • Summary and Conclusions

  • References