21. Macedonian Religion

  1. Joseph Roisman Professor of Classics3 and
  2. Ian Worthington Professor of History4
  1. Paul Christesen Associate Professor of Classics1 and
  2. Sarah C. Murray PhD student in Classics2

Published Online: 12 OCT 2010

DOI: 10.1002/9781444327519.ch21

A Companion to Ancient Macedonia

A Companion to Ancient Macedonia

How to Cite

Christesen, P. and Murray, S. C. (2010) Macedonian Religion, in A Companion to Ancient Macedonia (eds J. Roisman and I. Worthington), Wiley-Blackwell, Oxford, UK. doi: 10.1002/9781444327519.ch21

Editor Information

  1. 3

    Department of Classics, Colby College, USA

  2. 4

    Department of History, University of Missouri, USA

Author Information

  1. 1

    Department of Classics, Dartmouth College, USA

  2. 2

    Department of Classics, Stanford University, USA

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 12 OCT 2010
  2. Published Print: 19 NOV 2010

ISBN Information

Print ISBN: 9781405179362

Online ISBN: 9781444327519

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Keywords:

  • Macedonian religion;
  • Macedonian religion - appreciation of its immense complexity;
  • Macedonian religion in all its complexity – tasks, requiring a multi-volume series of its own;
  • deities of particular significance to Macedonians;
  • Macedonians, attachment to Gods - Zeus, Heracles, Artemis, Dionysus, and Isis and Sarapis;
  • early period, and Zeus - single most important deity in Macedonian pantheon;
  • Zeus' son Heracles's - prominent role in Macedonian religious practice;
  • votive reliefs and dedications - attesting importance to the worship of Artemis;
  • death as a passage into an afterlife - not part of standard Greek religious practice;
  • Macedonian religious practice, distinctive features - preference for expending resources on tombs than temples

Summary

This chapter contains sections titled:

  • Deities of Particular Significance to Macedonians

  • Death as a Passage into an Afterlife

  • Openness to Foreign Influences

  • Tombs not Temples

  • Role of the King

  • Divine Rulers

  • Conclusion

  • Bibliographical Essay