Chapter 32. Nystagmus and Oscillopsia

  1. Nils Erik Gilhus MD, PhD Professor1,
  2. Michael P. Barnes MD, FRCP Professor of Neurological Rehabilitation Medical Director2 and
  3. Michael Brainin MD Professor3

Published Online: 6 SEP 2010

DOI: 10.1002/9781444328394.ch32

European Handbook of Neurological Management, Second Edition, Volume 1, Second Edition

European Handbook of Neurological Management, Second Edition, Volume 1, Second Edition

How to Cite

Gilhus, N. E., Barnes, M. P. and Brainin, M. (2010) Nystagmus and Oscillopsia, in European Handbook of Neurological Management, Second Edition, Volume 1, Second Edition, Wiley-Blackwell, Oxford, UK. doi: 10.1002/9781444328394.ch32

Author Information

  1. 1

    Department of Clinical Medicine, University of Bergen and Department of Neurology, Haukeland University Hospital, Bergen, Norway

  2. 2

    University of Newcastle, Hunters Moor Neurorehabilitation Ltd, Newcastle upon Tyne, UK

  3. 3

    Department of Clinical Medicine and Prevention, and Center for Clinical Neurosciences, Donau-Universität Krems, Department of Neurology, Landesklinikum Donauregion Tulln Tulln, Austria

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 6 SEP 2010
  2. Published Print: 15 OCT 2010

ISBN Information

Print ISBN: 9781405185332

Online ISBN: 9781444328394

SEARCH

Keywords:

  • nystagmus and oscillopsia;
  • ocular motor system, stabilizing images - during eye and head movements on retina;
  • involuntary or abnormal eye movements - excessive motion of images on the retina - leading to blurred vision and to illusion that the seen world is moving (oscillopsia);
  • treatment options for nystagmus and oscillopsia;
  • supranuclear ocular motor disorders - central vestibular disorders, vestibulo-ocular reflex (VOR);
  • congenital nystagmus, a fixational nystagmus - characterized by gaze-dependent involuntary to and fro eye movements;
  • Downbeat nystagmus (DBN), central vestibular nystagmus - when the eyes are close or in primary gaze position;
  • Seesaw nystagmus, a rare pendular or jerk oscillation;
  • periodic alternating nystagmus - a spontaneous horizontal beating nystagmus;
  • superior oblique myokymia, consisting of paroxysmal monocular high-frequency oscillations

Summary

This chapter contains sections titled:

  • Introduction

  • Methods

  • Supranuclear ocular motor disorders

  • References