8. Clinical Aspects of von Willebrand Disease: Bleeding History

  1. Augusto B. Federici MD3,
  2. Christine A. Lee MA, MD, DSc (Med), FRCP, FRCPath, FRCOGad eundem4,
  3. Erik E. Berntorp MD, PhD5,
  4. David Lillicrap MD6 and
  5. Robert R. Montgomery MD7,8
  1. Paula D. James MD, FRCPC1 and
  2. Alberto Tosetto MD2

Published Online: 21 MAR 2011

DOI: 10.1002/9781444329926.ch8

Von Willebrand Disease: Basic and Clinical Aspects

Von Willebrand Disease: Basic and Clinical Aspects

How to Cite

James, P. D. and Tosetto, A. (2011) Clinical Aspects of von Willebrand Disease: Bleeding History, in Von Willebrand Disease: Basic and Clinical Aspects (eds A. B. Federici, C. A. Lee, E. E. Berntorp, D. Lillicrap and R. R. Montgomery), Wiley-Blackwell, Oxford, UK. doi: 10.1002/9781444329926.ch8

Editor Information

  1. 3

    Division of Hematology and Transfusion Medicine, L. Sacco University Hospital, Department of Internal Medicine, University of Milan, Milan, Italy

  2. 4

    University of London, London, UK

  3. 5

    Malmö Centre for Thrombosis and Haemostasis, Lund University, Skåne University Hospital, Malmö, Sweden

  4. 6

    Department of Pathology and Molecular Medicine, Richardson Laboratory, Queen's University, Kingston, ON, Canada

  5. 7

    Department of Pediatrics, Medical College of Wisconsin, Milwaukee, WI, USA

  6. 8

    Blood Research Institute, Blood Center of Wisconsin, Milwaukee, WI, USA

Author Information

  1. 1

    Etherington Hall, Queen's University, Kingston, ON, Canada

  2. 2

    Department of Hematology, San Bortolo Hospital, Vicenza, Italy

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 21 MAR 2011
  2. Published Print: 25 MAR 2011

ISBN Information

Print ISBN: 9781405195126

Online ISBN: 9781444329926

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Keywords:

  • mucocutaneous bleeding;
  • bleeding scores;
  • epitaxis;
  • menorrhagia

Summary

An accurate assessment of bleeding symptoms is a key component in the diagnosis of von Willebrand disease (VWD); however, it can present a significant challenge for both patients and physicians. In contrast to severe bleeding disorders, such as hemophilia A and B, which present with a unique and characteristic pattern of musculoskeletal bleeding, VWD typically presents with milder mucocutaneous bleeding symptoms that exhibit a great deal of overlap with symptoms reported by the normal population. Additionally, bleeding histories are subjective and significant symptoms can be overlooked and interpreted as “normal.” In contrast mild symptoms can be given undue consideration. This chapter will review key features of the bleeding symptoms present in VWD and will outline strategies that have been developed to standardize bleeding histories.