13. Fifty Years on: Confronting Elton's Hypotheses about Invasion Success with Data from Exotic Birds

  1. David M. Richardson
  1. Tim M. Blackburn1,
  2. Julie L. Lockwood2 and
  3. Phillip Cassey3,4

Published Online: 30 NOV 2010

DOI: 10.1002/9781444329988.ch13

Fifty Years of Invasion Ecology: The Legacy of Charles Elton

Fifty Years of Invasion Ecology: The Legacy of Charles Elton

How to Cite

Blackburn, T. M., Lockwood, J. L. and Cassey, P. (2010) Fifty Years on: Confronting Elton's Hypotheses about Invasion Success with Data from Exotic Birds, in Fifty Years of Invasion Ecology: The Legacy of Charles Elton (ed D. M. Richardson), Wiley-Blackwell, Oxford, UK. doi: 10.1002/9781444329988.ch13

Editor Information

  1. Centre for Invasion Biology, Department of Botany & Zoology, Stellenbosch University, 7602 Matieland, South Africa

Author Information

  1. 1

    Institute of Zoology, Zoological Society of London, Regent's Park, London NW1 4RY, UK

  2. 2

    Department of Ecology, Evolution and Natural Resources, Rutgers University, New Brunswick, NJ 08901-8551, USA

  3. 3

    School of Biosciences, Birmingham University, Edgbaston, UK

  4. 4

    School of Earth and Environmental Sciences, University of Adelaide, SA 5005, Australia

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 30 NOV 2010
  2. Published Print: 23 DEC 2010

ISBN Information

Print ISBN: 9781444335859

Online ISBN: 9781444329988

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Keywords:

  • fifty years, confronting Elton's hypotheses - about invasion success with data from exotic birds;
  • Charles Elton, recognizing importance of studying invasive species;
  • MacArthur's (1955) work - on relationship between diversity and stability;
  • bulk of Elton's book - how human activities facilitated spread of invasive organisms;
  • Elton's (1958) focus, influence of exotic location on invasion process;
  • simple communities, invaded than complex ones - tropics should be hard to invade;
  • bird invasions - revisiting Elton's hypotheses;
  • ‘introduced animals - replacing or reducing the numbers of native ones’;
  • existence of nest predation - by common myna;
  • Elton's (1958) prediction about invisibility - of anthropogenically modified habitats

Summary

This chapter contains sections titled:

  • Introduction

  • Statement 1 (Page 145): ‘I Will now Try to Set Out Some of the Evidence that the Balance of Relatively Simple Communities of Plants and Animals is more Easily Upset than that of Richer Ones … and More Vulnerable to Invasions.’

  • Statement 2 (Page 147): ‘The Natural Habitats on Small Islands Seem to be Much More Vulnerable to Invading Species than those on the Continents. This is Especially so on Oceanic Islands, Which have Rather Few Indigenous Species.’

  • Statement 3 (Pages 148 - 149): ‘The Fifth Line of Evidence Comes from the Tropics … There are Always Enough Enemies and Parasites Available to Turn on Any Species that Starts Being Unusually Numerous.’

  • Statement 4 (Page 63): ‘It Will be Noticed that Invasions Most Often Come to Cultivated Land, or to Land Much Modified by Human Practice.’

  • Statement 5 (Page 118): ‘Introduced Animals Often do Replace or Reduce the Numbers of Native Ones.’

  • Conclusions

  • Acknowledgements

  • References