4. The Rise and Fall of Biotic Nativeness: A Historical Perspective

  1. David M. Richardson
  1. Matthew K. Chew and
  2. Andrew L. Hamilton

Published Online: 30 NOV 2010

DOI: 10.1002/9781444329988.ch4

Fifty Years of Invasion Ecology: The Legacy of Charles Elton

Fifty Years of Invasion Ecology: The Legacy of Charles Elton

How to Cite

Chew, M. K. and Hamilton, A. L. (2010) The Rise and Fall of Biotic Nativeness: A Historical Perspective, in Fifty Years of Invasion Ecology: The Legacy of Charles Elton (ed D. M. Richardson), Wiley-Blackwell, Oxford, UK. doi: 10.1002/9781444329988.ch4

Editor Information

  1. Centre for Invasion Biology, Department of Botany & Zoology, Stellenbosch University, 7602 Matieland, South Africa

Author Information

  1. Arizona State University School of Life Sciences, Tempe, AZ 85287-4501, USA

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 30 NOV 2010
  2. Published Print: 23 DEC 2010

ISBN Information

Print ISBN: 9781444335859

Online ISBN: 9781444329988

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Keywords:

  • rise and fall of biotic nativeness - a historical perspective;
  • nativeness, an organizing principle - of scientific studies and findings;
  • human dispersal, rendering populations - and indeed any successor populations;
  • identifying specific biota - a deep history;
  • Henslow's notation for The New Botanist's Guide - to the localities of the rarer plants of Britain;
  • common law, regarding colonies - being complicated;
  • ‘civil claims’ Watson meant - to apply to botanical ‘colonists’, remaining uncertain;
  • diagnosing and applying nativeness;
  • biotic nativeness, theoretical work demanded of it;
  • Tamarix establishment - changes to ecological processes

Summary

This chapter contains sections titled:

  • Introduction: The Nativeness Problem

  • Nativeness Codified

  • Diagnosing and Applying Nativeness

  • Belonging in Place

  • Belonging Together

  • Conclusions: Belonging Belied

  • Authors' Note

  • Acknowledgements

  • References