18. Hepatitis B

  1. James S. Dooley MD, FRCP1,2,
  2. Anna S. F. Lok MBBS, MD, FRCP3,
  3. Andrew K. Burroughs FRCP, FMedSci2,4 and
  4. E. Jenny Heathcote MB BS, MD, FRCP, FRCP(C)5,6
  1. Anna S. F. Lok MBBS, MD, FRCP

Published Online: 5 MAY 2011

DOI: 10.1002/9781444341294.ch18

Sherlock's Diseases of the Liver and Biliary System, 12th Edition

Sherlock's Diseases of the Liver and Biliary System, 12th Edition

How to Cite

Lok, A. S. F. (2011) Hepatitis B, in Sherlock's Diseases of the Liver and Biliary System, 12th Edition (eds J. S. Dooley, A. S. F. Lok, A. K. Burroughs and E. J. Heathcote), Wiley-Blackwell, Oxford, UK. doi: 10.1002/9781444341294.ch18

Editor Information

  1. 1

    Centre for Hepatology, University College London Medical School, UK

  2. 2

    Royal Free Sheila Sherlock Liver Centre, Royal Free Hospital, London, UK

  3. 3

    Division of Gastroenterology, University of Michigan Health System, Ann Arbor, MI, USA

  4. 4

    University College London, London, UK

  5. 5

    Division of Gastroenterology, University Health Network, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada

  6. 6

    Patient Based Clinical Research, Toronto Western Hospital Research Institute, Toronto, Ontario, Canada

Author Information

  1. Division of Gastroenterology, University of Michigan Health System, Ann Arbor, MI, USA

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 5 MAY 2011
  2. Published Print: 25 APR 2011

ISBN Information

Print ISBN: 9781405134897

Online ISBN: 9781444341294

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Keywords:

  • hepatitis B vaccine;
  • hepatitis B virus;
  • cirrhosis;
  • hepatocellular carcinoma;
  • antiviral therapy

Summary

Hepatitis B is a major global public health problem. Approximately 400 million persons worldwide are chronically infected and are at risk of developing cirrhosis, liver failure and hepatocellular carcinoma. Hepatitis B vaccines are safe and effective in preventing hepatitis B infection and have also been shown to prevent hepatocellular carcinoma. Host, viral and environmental factors contribute to disease progression. There are seven approved therapies for hepatitis B: two formulations of interferon and five orally administered nucleos(t)ide analogues. The availability of multiple treatment options has led to expansion of treatment indications and in turn improvement of clinical outcomes.