11. Dung Beetle Populations: Structure and Consequences

  1. Leigh W. Simmons3 and
  2. T. James Ridsdill-Smith4
  1. Tomas Roslin1 and
  2. Heidi Viljanen2

Published Online: 20 APR 2011

DOI: 10.1002/9781444342000.ch11

Ecology and Evolution of Dung Beetles

Ecology and Evolution of Dung Beetles

How to Cite

Roslin, T. and Viljanen, H. (2011) Dung Beetle Populations: Structure and Consequences, in Ecology and Evolution of Dung Beetles (eds L. W. Simmons and T. J. Ridsdill-Smith), John Wiley & Sons, Ltd, Chichester, UK. doi: 10.1002/9781444342000.ch11

Editor Information

  1. 3

    Centre for Evolutionary Biology, School of Animal Biology, University of Western Australia, Crawley, 6009, Crawley, Western Australia

  2. 4

    School of Animal Biology, University of Western Australia, Crawley 6009, Crawley, Western Australia

Author Information

  1. 1

    Department of Agricultural Sciences, PO Box 27, FI-00014 University of Helsinki, Finland

  2. 2

    Metapopulation Research Group, Department of Biological and Environmental Sciences, PO Box 65, FI-00014 University of Helsinki, Finland

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 20 APR 2011
  2. Published Print: 8 APR 2011

ISBN Information

Print ISBN: 9781444333152

Online ISBN: 9781444342000

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Keywords:

  • Rangifer tarandus;
  • Odocoileus virginianus;
  • Capreolus capreolus;
  • Habitat and resource selection;
  • Aphodius pusillus;
  • Oxysternon conspicillatus;
  • Canthon acutus

Summary

This chapter contains sections titled:

  • Introduction

  • Study systems

  • Range size

  • Habitat and resource selection

  • Dung beetle movement

  • The genetic structure of dung beetle populations

  • Consequences: spatial population structures and responses to habitat loss

  • Perspectives