3. Male Contest Competition and the Evolution of Weapons

  1. Leigh W. Simmons2 and
  2. T. James Ridsdill-Smith3
  1. Robert Knell

Published Online: 20 APR 2011

DOI: 10.1002/9781444342000.ch3

Ecology and Evolution of Dung Beetles

Ecology and Evolution of Dung Beetles

How to Cite

Knell, R. (2011) Male Contest Competition and the Evolution of Weapons, in Ecology and Evolution of Dung Beetles (eds L. W. Simmons and T. J. Ridsdill-Smith), John Wiley & Sons, Ltd, Chichester, UK. doi: 10.1002/9781444342000.ch3

Editor Information

  1. 2

    Centre for Evolutionary Biology, School of Animal Biology, University of Western Australia, Crawley, 6009, Crawley, Western Australia

  2. 3

    School of Animal Biology, University of Western Australia, Crawley 6009, Crawley, Western Australia

Author Information

  1. School of Biological and Chemical Sciences, Queen Mary University of London, Mile End Road, London E1 4NS, UK

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 20 APR 2011
  2. Published Print: 8 APR 2011

ISBN Information

Print ISBN: 9781444333152

Online ISBN: 9781444342000

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Keywords:

  • Heliocopris andersoni;
  • Coprophanaeus ensifer;
  • Typhaeus typhoeus;
  • Horns as predictors of victory;
  • Phanaeus difformis;
  • Bolitotherus cornutus;
  • Euoniticellus intermedius;
  • Typhaeus typhoeus;
  • Sisyphus

Summary

This chapter contains sections titled:

  • Introduction

  • Dung beetle horns as weapons

  • Functional morphology of horns

  • Horns as predictors of victory

  • Are beetle horns simply tools?

  • The evolution of horns: rollers vs. tunnellers

  • The evolution of horns: population density

  • The evolution of horns: sex ratio

  • Future work