4. Sexual Selection after Mating: The Evolutionary Consequences of Sperm Competition and Cryptic Female Choice in Onthophagines

  1. Leigh W. Simmons1 and
  2. T. James Ridsdill-Smith2
  1. Leigh W. Simmons

Published Online: 20 APR 2011

DOI: 10.1002/9781444342000.ch4

Ecology and Evolution of Dung Beetles

Ecology and Evolution of Dung Beetles

How to Cite

Simmons, L. W. (2011) Sexual Selection after Mating: The Evolutionary Consequences of Sperm Competition and Cryptic Female Choice in Onthophagines, in Ecology and Evolution of Dung Beetles (eds L. W. Simmons and T. J. Ridsdill-Smith), John Wiley & Sons, Ltd, Chichester, UK. doi: 10.1002/9781444342000.ch4

Editor Information

  1. 1

    Centre for Evolutionary Biology, School of Animal Biology, University of Western Australia, Crawley, 6009, Crawley, Western Australia

  2. 2

    School of Animal Biology, University of Western Australia, Crawley 6009, Crawley, Western Australia

Author Information

  1. Centre for Evolutionary Biology, School of Animal Biology, University of Western Australia, Crawley, 6009, Crawley, Western Australia

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 20 APR 2011
  2. Published Print: 8 APR 2011

ISBN Information

Print ISBN: 9781444333152

Online ISBN: 9781444342000

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Keywords:

  • Sperm competition theory;
  • D. bipectinata;
  • Drosophila simulans;
  • Onthophagus taurus;
  • Onthophagus – O. australis, O. binodis, and O. taurus;
  • Quantitative genetics of ejaculate traits

Summary

This chapter contains sections titled:

  • Introduction

  • Sperm competition theory

  • Evolution of ejaculate expenditure in the genus Onthophagus

  • Evolutionary consequences of variation in ejaculate expenditure

  • Theoretical models of female choice

  • Quantitative genetics of ejaculate traits

  • Empirical evidence for adaptive cryptic female choice in Onthophagus taurus

  • Conclusions and future directions

  • Dedication and acknowledgement