143. Cutis Laxa

  1. Alan D. Irvine MD, FRCPI, FRCP2,3,
  2. Peter H. Hoeger MD4,5 and
  3. Albert C. Yan MD, FAAP, FAAD6,7
  1. Richard J. Antaya MD, FAAD, FAAP

Published Online: 24 MAY 2011

DOI: 10.1002/9781444345384.ch143

Harper's Textbook of Pediatric Dermatology, Volume 1, 2, Third Edition

Harper's Textbook of Pediatric Dermatology, Volume 1, 2, Third Edition

How to Cite

Antaya, R. J. (2011) Cutis Laxa, in Harper's Textbook of Pediatric Dermatology, Volume 1, 2, Third Edition (eds A. D. Irvine, P. H. Hoeger and A. C. Yan), Wiley-Blackwell, Oxford, UK. doi: 10.1002/9781444345384.ch143

Editor Information

  1. 2

    Trinity College, Dublin, Ireland

  2. 3

    Our Lady's Children's Hospital, Dublin, Ireland

  3. 4

    University of Hamburg, Hamburg, Germany

  4. 5

    Catholic Children's Hospital Wilhelmstift, Hamburg, Germany

  5. 6

    University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine, Philadelphia, PA, USA

  6. 7

    The Children's Hospital of Philadelphia, Philadelphia, PA, USA

Author Information

  1. Department of Pediatric Dermatology, Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, CT, USA

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 24 MAY 2011
  2. Published Print: 3 JUN 2011

ISBN Information

Print ISBN: 9781405176958

Online ISBN: 9781444345384

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Keywords:

  • dermatochalasis;
  • dermatomegaly;
  • generalized elastolysis;
  • loose skin folds;
  • bloodhound-like

Summary

The term cutis laxa (dermatochalasis, dermatomegaly) denotes the clinical expression of several extremely rare, heterogeneous disorders of elastic tissue, characterized by loose, inelastic skin that is pendulous and hangs in folds, giving a prematurely aged or bloodhound-like appearance. Some forms with significant systemic involvement are better termed generalized elastolysis. To date there are no accepted medical therapies, however, plastic surgery is effective for removal of excess skin folds, thereby improving the appearance and limiting the emotional trauma caused by severe disfigurement