149. Alopecia Areata

  1. Alan D. Irvine MD, FRCPI, FRCP2,3,
  2. Peter H. Hoeger MD4,5 and
  3. Albert C. Yan MD, FAAP, FAAD6,7
  1. Kerstin Foitzik-Lau MD

Published Online: 24 MAY 2011

DOI: 10.1002/9781444345384.ch149

Harper's Textbook of Pediatric Dermatology, Volume 1, 2, Third Edition

Harper's Textbook of Pediatric Dermatology, Volume 1, 2, Third Edition

How to Cite

Foitzik-Lau, K. (2011) Alopecia Areata, in Harper's Textbook of Pediatric Dermatology, Volume 1, 2, Third Edition (eds A. D. Irvine, P. H. Hoeger and A. C. Yan), Wiley-Blackwell, Oxford, UK. doi: 10.1002/9781444345384.ch149

Editor Information

  1. 2

    Trinity College, Dublin, Ireland

  2. 3

    Our Lady's Children's Hospital, Dublin, Ireland

  3. 4

    University of Hamburg, Hamburg, Germany

  4. 5

    Catholic Children's Hospital Wilhelmstift, Hamburg, Germany

  5. 6

    University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine, Philadelphia, PA, USA

  6. 7

    The Children's Hospital of Philadelphia, Philadelphia, PA, USA

Author Information

  1. Department of Pediatric Dermatology, Catholic Children's Hospital Wilhelmstift, Hamburg, Germany

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 24 MAY 2011
  2. Published Print: 3 JUN 2011

ISBN Information

Print ISBN: 9781405176958

Online ISBN: 9781444345384

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Keywords:

  • alopecia areata;
  • autoimmune disease;
  • immune privilege;
  • hair follicle;
  • HLA association;
  • corticosteroids;
  • immunotherapy;
  • anthralin;
  • DCP;
  • minoxidil

Summary

Alopecia areata is a non-scarring multifocal hair growth disorder characterized by initially patchy hair loss, which can occur on any hair-bearing site of the body. It can be limited to few circular bald areas and can lead to complete baldness of the head or the entire body. Alopecia areata is believed to be an autoimmune disease with a genetic basis and environmental trigger. Immunosuppressing or immunomodulating agents are frequently used and are variably effective in the treatment of alopecia areata, but there are still no options to cure the disease or prevent relapses. Treatment options such as corticosteroids, topical sensitizers and minoxidil are discussed in the following chapter.