156. Sweet Syndrome

  1. Alan D. Irvine MD, FRCPI, FRCP2,3,
  2. Peter H. Hoeger MD4,5 and
  3. Albert C. Yan MD, FAAP, FAAD6,7
  1. Peter von den Driesch MD

Published Online: 24 MAY 2011

DOI: 10.1002/9781444345384.ch156

Harper's Textbook of Pediatric Dermatology, Volume 1, 2, Third Edition

Harper's Textbook of Pediatric Dermatology, Volume 1, 2, Third Edition

How to Cite

von den Driesch, P. (2011) Sweet Syndrome, in Harper's Textbook of Pediatric Dermatology, Volume 1, 2, Third Edition (eds A. D. Irvine, P. H. Hoeger and A. C. Yan), Wiley-Blackwell, Oxford, UK. doi: 10.1002/9781444345384.ch156

Editor Information

  1. 2

    Trinity College, Dublin, Ireland

  2. 3

    Our Lady's Children's Hospital, Dublin, Ireland

  3. 4

    University of Hamburg, Hamburg, Germany

  4. 5

    Catholic Children's Hospital Wilhelmstift, Hamburg, Germany

  5. 6

    University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine, Philadelphia, PA, USA

  6. 7

    The Children's Hospital of Philadelphia, Philadelphia, PA, USA

Author Information

  1. Department for Dermatology and Allergy, Center for Dermatology, Stuttgart, Germany

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 24 MAY 2011
  2. Published Print: 3 JUN 2011

ISBN Information

Print ISBN: 9781405176958

Online ISBN: 9781444345384

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Keywords:

  • acute febrile neutrophilic dermatosis;
  • child;
  • corticosteroids;
  • haematology;
  • malaise;
  • paediatric;
  • parainflammatory occurrence;
  • paraneoplastic occurrence;
  • plaques;
  • Sweet syndrome;
  • vasculitis

Summary

Sweet syndrome has garnered attracted medical interest since its original description by the English dermatologist Robert Douglas Sweet in 1964. It is characterized by the abrupt occurrence of multiple tender plaques accompanied by general malaise. One interesting feature of the disease is the enormous variety of associated diseases in about 50% of cases. Connection to almost all severe haematological diseases, solid malignant tumours and many inflammatory diseases ranging from tonsillitis to Crohn disease has been described. The pathogenesis remains unclear. Treatment normally consists of oral corticosteroids, but many alternatives have been suggested.