161. Acute Haemorrhagic Oedema of the Skin in Infancy

  1. Alan D. Irvine MD, FRCPI, FRCP3,4,
  2. Peter H. Hoeger MD5,6 and
  3. Albert C. Yan MD, FAAP, FAAD7,8
  1. Alain Taïeb MD1 and
  2. Valérie Legrain MD2

Published Online: 24 MAY 2011

DOI: 10.1002/9781444345384.ch161

Harper's Textbook of Pediatric Dermatology, Volume 1, 2, Third Edition

Harper's Textbook of Pediatric Dermatology, Volume 1, 2, Third Edition

How to Cite

Taïeb, A. and Legrain, V. (2011) Acute Haemorrhagic Oedema of the Skin in Infancy, in Harper's Textbook of Pediatric Dermatology, Volume 1, 2, Third Edition (eds A. D. Irvine, P. H. Hoeger and A. C. Yan), Wiley-Blackwell, Oxford, UK. doi: 10.1002/9781444345384.ch161

Editor Information

  1. 3

    Trinity College, Dublin, Ireland

  2. 4

    Our Lady's Children's Hospital, Dublin, Ireland

  3. 5

    University of Hamburg, Hamburg, Germany

  4. 6

    Catholic Children's Hospital Wilhelmstift, Hamburg, Germany

  5. 7

    University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine, Philadelphia, PA, USA

  6. 8

    The Children's Hospital of Philadelphia, Philadelphia, PA, USA

Author Information

  1. 1

    Professor of Dermatology, Department of Dermatology and Pediatric Dermatology, H ô pital Saint - Andr é, Bordeaux, France

  2. 2

    Consultant Dermatologist, Department of Dermatology, H ô pital Saint - Andr é, Bordeaux, France

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 24 MAY 2011
  2. Published Print: 3 JUN 2011

ISBN Information

Print ISBN: 9781405176958

Online ISBN: 9781444345384

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Keywords:

  • vasculitis;
  • purpura;
  • IgA;
  • Schoenlein-Henoch purpura;
  • ILVEN

Summary

Acute haemorrhagic oedema of the skin in infancy is a leucocytoclastic vasculitis with an alarming clinical presentation and a benign clinical course. Seasonal variation and the frequency of preceding respiratory infection or vaccination suggest a parainfectious cause. The cutaneous features include inflammatory oedema and ecchymotic purpura of the limbs (mainly the extremities) and face (cheeks, eyelids and ears). The purpura often appear in a cockade (targetoid) pattern, especially in confluent lesions. Spontaneous and complete resolution occurs within 1-3 weeks, after one to three outbreaks of new lesions. Treatment is usually not needed.