32. Aeroallergies and Atopic Eczema

  1. Alan D. Irvine MD, FRCPI, FRCP3,4,
  2. Peter H. Hoeger MD5,6 and
  3. Albert C. Yan MD, FAAP, FAAD7,8
  1. Ann-Marie Powell MD, FRCPI1,
  2. Gideon Lack MBBCH (Oxon), MA (Oxon), FRCPCH2 and
  3. Adam Fox FRCPCH2

Published Online: 24 MAY 2011

DOI: 10.1002/9781444345384.ch32

Harper's Textbook of Pediatric Dermatology, Volume 1, 2, Third Edition

Harper's Textbook of Pediatric Dermatology, Volume 1, 2, Third Edition

How to Cite

Powell, A.-M., Lack, G. and Fox, A. (2011) Aeroallergies and Atopic Eczema, in Harper's Textbook of Pediatric Dermatology, Volume 1, 2, Third Edition (eds A. D. Irvine, P. H. Hoeger and A. C. Yan), Wiley-Blackwell, Oxford, UK. doi: 10.1002/9781444345384.ch32

Editor Information

  1. 3

    Trinity College, Dublin, Ireland

  2. 4

    Our Lady's Children's Hospital, Dublin, Ireland

  3. 5

    University of Hamburg, Hamburg, Germany

  4. 6

    Catholic Children's Hospital Wilhelmstift, Hamburg, Germany

  5. 7

    University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine, Philadelphia, PA, USA

  6. 8

    The Children's Hospital of Philadelphia, Philadelphia, PA, USA

Author Information

  1. 1

    Department of Paediatric and Genetic Dermatology, St John's Institute of Dermatology, Guy's and St Thomas' NHS Foundation Trust, London, UK

  2. 2

    King's College London, MRC and Asthma UK Centre in Allergic, Mechanisms of Asthma, Division of Asthma, Allergy and Lung Biology, Guy's and St Thomas' NHS Foundation Trust, London, UK

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 24 MAY 2011
  2. Published Print: 3 JUN 2011

ISBN Information

Print ISBN: 9781405176958

Online ISBN: 9781444345384

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Keywords:

  • aeroallergy;
  • atopic dermatitis;
  • atopic march;
  • atopy;
  • avoidance measures;
  • eczema;
  • housedust mite;
  • pollen;
  • specific immunotherapy

Summary

Aeroallergens are airborne proteins traditionally considered to be mainly associated with asthma- and rhinoconjunctivitis-type allergic reactions. For some children with atopic dermatitis, aeroallergens may be relevant contributory or exacerbating factors. Furthermore, current theories suggest that eczema may itself predispose to aeroallergen sensitization and onward progression through the atopic march. Aeroallergens are not passive bystanders and many have distinct properties contributing to their allergenicity. Confirming a diagnosis of aeroallergen-exacerbated eczema in patients with a suggestive history and clinical features is challenging and at best indirect. However, identification of an association with a specific aeroallergy may be of benefit to patients in helping to define causality, anticipating flares and in providing a rationale for avoidance strategies, as well as a basis for specific immunotherapy. Optimization of eczema management will aid restoration of epidermal barrier function and may reduce sensitivity to airborne allergens for those already sensitized but, importantly, may prevent sensitization among aeroallergen-naïve infants.