39. Pompholyx

  1. Alan D. Irvine MD, FRCPI, FRCP3,4,
  2. Peter H. Hoeger MD5,6 and
  3. Albert C. Yan MD, FAAP, FAAD7,8
  1. Carlo M. Gelmetti MD1,2

Published Online: 24 MAY 2011

DOI: 10.1002/9781444345384.ch39

Harper's Textbook of Pediatric Dermatology, Volume 1, 2, Third Edition

Harper's Textbook of Pediatric Dermatology, Volume 1, 2, Third Edition

How to Cite

Gelmetti, C. M. (2011) Pompholyx, in Harper's Textbook of Pediatric Dermatology, Volume 1, 2, Third Edition (eds A. D. Irvine, P. H. Hoeger and A. C. Yan), Wiley-Blackwell, Oxford, UK. doi: 10.1002/9781444345384.ch39

Editor Information

  1. 3

    Trinity College, Dublin, Ireland

  2. 4

    Our Lady's Children's Hospital, Dublin, Ireland

  3. 5

    University of Hamburg, Hamburg, Germany

  4. 6

    Catholic Children's Hospital Wilhelmstift, Hamburg, Germany

  5. 7

    University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine, Philadelphia, PA, USA

  6. 8

    The Children's Hospital of Philadelphia, Philadelphia, PA, USA

Author Information

  1. 1

    Department of Anesthesia, Intensive Care and Dermatologic Sciences, Università degli Studi di Milano, Milan, Italy

  2. 2

    Unit of Pediatric Dermatology, Fondazione IRCCS Ca' Granda Ospedale, Maggiore Policlinico, Milan, Italy

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 24 MAY 2011
  2. Published Print: 3 JUN 2011

ISBN Information

Print ISBN: 9781405176958

Online ISBN: 9781444345384

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Keywords:

  • pompholyx;
  • dyshidrosis;
  • vesicular eczema of palms and soles;
  • dyshidrotic eczema;
  • palmoplantar eczema

Summary

Pompholyx, also called dyshidrosis, is a recurring acute eczematous eruption, composed of discrete, well-visible crops of vesicles situated mostly on the palms and soles, and along the sides of fingers and toes. The term ‘dyshidrotic eczema’ is a misnomer because the disorder is not related to secretion or excretion of sweat; indeed the evolving lesions show eczematous changes. When pompholyx is not an expression of contact allergy (including nickel in some foods) or an -id reaction to mycotic infections, it should be considered a manifestation of the atopic diathesis. In idiopathic cases no cure is available, but super-potent topical corticosteroids can be helpful.