43. Juvenile Plantar Dermatosis

  1. Alan D. Irvine MD, FRCPI, FRCP3,4,
  2. Peter H. Hoeger MD5,6 and
  3. Albert C. Yan MD, FAAP, FAAD7,8
  1. John Browning MD, FAAD, FAAP1 and
  2. Alanna Bree MD2

Published Online: 24 MAY 2011

DOI: 10.1002/9781444345384.ch43

Harper's Textbook of Pediatric Dermatology, Volume 1, 2, Third Edition

Harper's Textbook of Pediatric Dermatology, Volume 1, 2, Third Edition

How to Cite

Browning, J. and Bree, A. (2011) Juvenile Plantar Dermatosis, in Harper's Textbook of Pediatric Dermatology, Volume 1, 2, Third Edition (eds A. D. Irvine, P. H. Hoeger and A. C. Yan), Wiley-Blackwell, Oxford, UK. doi: 10.1002/9781444345384.ch43

Editor Information

  1. 3

    Trinity College, Dublin, Ireland

  2. 4

    Our Lady's Children's Hospital, Dublin, Ireland

  3. 5

    University of Hamburg, Hamburg, Germany

  4. 6

    Catholic Children's Hospital Wilhelmstift, Hamburg, Germany

  5. 7

    University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine, Philadelphia, PA, USA

  6. 8

    The Children's Hospital of Philadelphia, Philadelphia, PA, USA

Author Information

  1. 1

    Pediatric Dermatology Section, University of Texas Health Science Center, San Antonio, TX, USA

  2. 2

    Dermatology Specialists of Houston, Bellaire, TX, USA

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 24 MAY 2011
  2. Published Print: 3 JUN 2011

ISBN Information

Print ISBN: 9781405176958

Online ISBN: 9781444345384

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Keywords:

  • juvenile;
  • plantar;
  • dermatosis;
  • atopy;
  • feet

Summary

Juvenile plantar dermatosis (JPD) is characterized by symmetric, shiny, erythema, along with superficial desquamation and fissuring, of the weight-bearing surfaces of the feet that affects children and young adolescents with a recurring course. A personal history of atopy is common. Occlusion and subsequent friction can lead to perspiration and maceration of the feet. It has been hypothesized that transition from “wet to dry” is likely the cause. JPD is self-limiting and usually resolves by 12-16 years of age. Treatments recommendations include use of cotton socks or sandals. Emollients, barrier creams, antiperspirants and topical anti-inflammatory medications provide variable success.