49. Viral Exanthems

  1. Alan D. Irvine MD, FRCPI, FRCP4,5,
  2. Peter H. Hoeger MD6,7 and
  3. Albert C. Yan MD, FAAP, FAAD8,9
  1. Wynnis L. Tom MD1,2 and
  2. Sheila Fallon Friedlander MD3

Published Online: 24 MAY 2011

DOI: 10.1002/9781444345384.ch49

Harper's Textbook of Pediatric Dermatology, Volume 1, 2, Third Edition

Harper's Textbook of Pediatric Dermatology, Volume 1, 2, Third Edition

How to Cite

Tom, W. L. and Fallon Friedlander, S. (2011) Viral Exanthems, in Harper's Textbook of Pediatric Dermatology, Volume 1, 2, Third Edition (eds A. D. Irvine, P. H. Hoeger and A. C. Yan), Wiley-Blackwell, Oxford, UK. doi: 10.1002/9781444345384.ch49

Editor Information

  1. 4

    Trinity College, Dublin, Ireland

  2. 5

    Our Lady's Children's Hospital, Dublin, Ireland

  3. 6

    University of Hamburg, Hamburg, Germany

  4. 7

    Catholic Children's Hospital Wilhelmstift, Hamburg, Germany

  5. 8

    University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine, Philadelphia, PA, USA

  6. 9

    The Children's Hospital of Philadelphia, Philadelphia, PA, USA

Author Information

  1. 1

    Departments of Pediatrics and Medicine (Dermatology), University of California, San Diego, CA, USA

  2. 2

    Rady Children's Hospital, San Diego, CA, USA

  3. 3

    Departments of Pediatrics and Medicine (Dermatology), University of California, Rady Children's Hospital, San Diego, CA, USA

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 24 MAY 2011
  2. Published Print: 3 JUN 2011

ISBN Information

Print ISBN: 9781405176958

Online ISBN: 9781444345384

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Keywords:

  • asymmetrical periflexural exanthem;
  • enterovirus;
  • herpesvirus;
  • measles;
  • mononucleosis;
  • parvovirus;
  • roseola;
  • rubella;
  • varicella;
  • viral exanthem

Summary

Viral-induced exanthems are diffuse cutaneous eruptions often accompanied by systemic symptoms. The number of recognized exanthems has grown since the original description of the ‘six classic exanthems’ in the early 1900s. This chapter reviews these viral eruptions and their major features, including history of illness, pattern of eruption and laboratory evaluation. Advances in vaccination, therapy and prevention have markedly decreased the incidence of the major diseases. Nevertheless, those that continue to affect children and their contacts can have serious sequelae, making prompt recognition and management imperative.