71. Papular Urticaria

  1. Alan D. Irvine MD, FRCPI, FRCP2,3,
  2. Peter H. Hoeger MD4,5 and
  3. Albert C. Yan MD, FAAP, FAAD6,7
  1. Ian F. Burgess MSc, MPhil, FRES

Published Online: 24 MAY 2011

DOI: 10.1002/9781444345384.ch71

Harper's Textbook of Pediatric Dermatology, Volume 1, 2, Third Edition

Harper's Textbook of Pediatric Dermatology, Volume 1, 2, Third Edition

How to Cite

Burgess, I. F. (2011) Papular Urticaria, in Harper's Textbook of Pediatric Dermatology, Volume 1, 2, Third Edition (eds A. D. Irvine, P. H. Hoeger and A. C. Yan), Wiley-Blackwell, Oxford, UK. doi: 10.1002/9781444345384.ch71

Editor Information

  1. 2

    Trinity College, Dublin, Ireland

  2. 3

    Our Lady's Children's Hospital, Dublin, Ireland

  3. 4

    University of Hamburg, Hamburg, Germany

  4. 5

    Catholic Children's Hospital Wilhelmstift, Hamburg, Germany

  5. 6

    University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine, Philadelphia, PA, USA

  6. 7

    The Children's Hospital of Philadelphia, Philadelphia, PA, USA

Author Information

  1. Medical Entomology Centre, Insect Research & Development Limited, Cambridge, UK

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 24 MAY 2011
  2. Published Print: 3 JUN 2011

ISBN Information

Print ISBN: 9781405176958

Online ISBN: 9781444345384

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Keywords:

  • allergy;
  • bed bug;
  • blood feeding;
  • delayed hypersensitivity;
  • flea;
  • immediate hypersensitivity;
  • impetigo;
  • insect bite;
  • maculopapular reaction;
  • mosquito

Summary

Papular urticaria is the itchy papular reaction resulting from repeated insect biting. Historically it was associated with fleas and bed bugs in conditions of 18th-century squalour and more recently with any haematophagous arthropods. The aetiology and progression of reactions to insect bites are now better defined but understanding of the histopathology is relatively poor, mainly because patients have widely differing experiences of exposure to biting insects. Secondary infection of bite lesions may be common following excoriation of lesions. There are no reliable treatments for the condition and prevention of biting by means of repellents or avoiding exposure altogether by covering the skin gives the best outcome.